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Far More Terrible for Women: Personal…
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Far More Terrible for Women: Personal Accounts of Women in Slavery (2006)

by Patrick Minges

Other authors: See the other authors section.

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This was interesting, but hard to read at times because of the way that all of the slang words were written. I am from South Alabama, so I speak and understand southern & "country" slang very well. I still had to slow down to read parts of this book. These are the personal stories of women who were previously slaves. The stories are often sad, but sometimes happy. It is an interesting book for anyone interested in history or the history of slavery. ( )
  ladybug74 | Dec 16, 2009 |
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» Add other authors (2 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Patrick Mingesprimary authorall editionscalculated
Hampton, Deborah LongDesignersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Tarleton, JohnCompositionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Epigraph
Dedication
To Marion Szulkowski Payler, whose courage and strength of character reflect the women of this work.
First words
When they told me my new-born babe was a girl, my heart was heavier than it had ever been before. (Introduction)
What do we know about the life of women under the "peculiar institution" of slavery as it was practiced in the United States in the nineteenth century? (Introduction)
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Book description
Contents
Introduction

Jezebel and Mammy
Rose Williams
Louisa Everett
Leah Garrett
Rena Clark
Aunt Betty Cofer
Betty Quesnesberry

Friends and Families
Rosa Starke
Tempie Herndon Durham
Lula Jackson
Julia "Aunt Sally" Brown
Emmaline Kilpatrick
Slavery Cooking

Witches/Doctors

Ma Stevens
Emmaline Heard
Easter Sudie Campbell
Josephine Anderson
Amanda Styles

Mother/Child
Adah Isabelle Suggs
Lulu Wilson
Parthena Rollins
Ethel Daugherty

Herstory
Charity Moore
Mary Anngady
Mary Reynolds
Valley Perry
Maggie Wesmoland
Silvia King

Endnotes
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0895873230, Paperback)

Drawing from interviews that the New Deal's Works Progress Administration conducted with former slaves in the 1930s, this book presents firsthand accounts of what life was like from the perspective of enslaved women. Of the nearly 2500 narratives, approximately two thirds of them are from women. In searching for the most compelling stories, Minges discovered some common themes, which include witch/doctor, friends/families, mother/child, and Jezebel/Mammy. These stories contain dramatic images of life and death, pain and perseverance, devastation and deliverance-all related by the women whose memories serve as a record and reflection of this turbulent time in American history.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:22:08 -0400)

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