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Minders of Make-Believe: Idealists,…
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Minders of Make-Believe: Idealists, Entrepreneurs, and the Shaping of…

by Leonard S. Marcus

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Checked it out from library, determined that it's way too scholarly for my mood & energy right now. Dipped into the index to see if it covered topics of interest to me, results inconclusive. May try again someday, may not.
  Cheryl_in_CC_NV | Jun 5, 2016 |
Marcus has written a very interesting history of publishing English books for children in the United States from the 1690 New England Primer to the midnight release of Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire in July 2000. The twentieth century, when publishers first appointed knowledgeable women editors to begin and run specialized children’s imprints, gets the most coverage. As the subtitle advertises, the debates in the field supply the story’s plot: should books for children be educational or entertaining, truth or fiction, draw upon folktales or the daily sensations of children in their new modern environment, is our business literature or commerce, and is children’s literature really literature at all? The characters, and there are some characters, are supplied by the publishers, editors, librarians, and educators who wrestle with these issues and the economic necessity of keeping their enterprises afloat. ( )
  MaowangVater | Jun 16, 2009 |
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0395674077, Hardcover)

An animated first-time history of the visionaries--editors, authors, librarians, booksellers, and others--whose passion for books has transformed American childhood and American culture

What should children read? As the preeminent children’s literature authority, Leonard S. Marcus, shows incisively, that’s the three-hundred-year-old question that sparked the creation of a rambunctious children’s book publishing scene in Colonial times. And it’s the urgent issue that went on to fuel the transformation of twentieth-century children’s book publishing from a genteel backwater to big business.
Marcus delivers a provocative look at the fierce turf wars fought among pioneering editors, progressive educators, and librarians--most of them women--throughout the twentieth century. His story of the emergence and growth of the major publishing houses--and of the distinctive literature for the young they shaped--gains extraordinary depth (and occasional dish) through the author’s path-finding research and in-depth interviews with dozens of editors, artists, and other key publishing figures whose careers go back to the 1930s, including Maurice Sendak, Ursula Nordstrom, Margaret K. McElderry, and Margret Rey.
From The New England Primer to The Cat in the Hat to Cormier’s The Chocolate War, Marcus offers a richly informed, witty appraisal of the pivotal books that transformed children’s book publishing, and brings alive the revealing synergy between books like these and the national mood of their times.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:25:28 -0400)

What should children read? As children's literature authority Leonard S. Marcus shows, that question created a rambunctious children's book publishing scene in colonial times, and went on to fuel the transformation of twentieth-century children's book publishing from genteel backwater to big business. Marcus delivers a provocative look at the fierce turf wars fought among pioneering editors, progressive educators, and librarians throughout the twentieth century. His story of the emergence, growth, and impact of the major publishing houses gains dramatic depth (and occasional dish) through the author's pathfinding research and in-depth interviews with dozens of editors, artists, and other key publishing figures whose careers go back to the 1930s. From The New England Primer to The Chocolate War, Marcus offers a witty analysis of the pivotal books that transformed children's book publishing, and brings alive the revealing synergy between books like these and the national mood of their times.--From publisher description.… (more)

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