HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Viewing Renaissance Art by Kim W. Woods
Loading...

Viewing Renaissance Art

by Kim W. Woods (Editor), Angeliki Lymberopoulou (Editor), Carol M. Richardson (Editor)

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: Renaissance Art Reconsidered (Volume 3)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations
32None347,362 (4)None

None.

None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

No reviews
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Woods, Kim W.Editorprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Lymberopoulou, AngelikiEditormain authorall editionsconfirmed
Richardson, Carol M.Editormain authorall editionsconfirmed
Lymberopoulou, AngelikiEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Richardson, Carol M.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (2)

Book description
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0300123434, Paperback)

This book focuses on the values, priorities, and motives of patrons and the purposes and functions of art works produced north and south of the Alps and in post-Byzantine Crete. It begins by considering the social range and character of Renaissance patronage and ends with a study of Hans Holbein the Younger and the reform of religious images in Basle and England.
Viewing Renaissance Art considers a wide range of audiences and patrons from the rulers of France to the poorest confraternities in Florence. The overriding premise is that art was not a neutral matter of stylistic taste but an aspect of material production in which values were invested—whether religious, cultural, social, or political.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:12:21 -0400)

No library descriptions found.

Quick Links

Swap Ebooks Audio

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (4)
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5
3
3.5
4 1
4.5
5

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

You are using the new servers! | About | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 117,054,380 books! | Top bar: Always visible