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Watching the Spring Festival: Poems by Frank…
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Watching the Spring Festival: Poems

by Frank Bidart

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I may not be broadly read enough to get all the allusions within this, but it is a difficult to follow group of poems to follow. Bidart writes with a nice rhythm but the poems often center in on quite brutal sexual images or existential questions of inadequacy which makes for some depressing reading. It was not what I expected from the title. ( )
  ThinkNeil | May 16, 2009 |
Love the Sanjaya poem. ( )
  MatthewHittinger | Dec 29, 2008 |
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0374286035, Hardcover)

This is Frank Bidart’s first book of lyrics—his first book not dominated by long poems. Narrative elaboration becomes speed and song. Less embattled than earlier work, less actively violent, these new poems have, by conceding time’s finalities and triumphs, acquired a dark radiance unlike anything seen before in Bidart’s long career.
 
Mortality—imminent, not theoretical—forces the self to question the relation between the actual life lived and what was once the promise of transformation. This plays out against a broad landscape. The book opens with Marilyn Monroe, followed by the glamour of the eighth-century Chinese imperial court (seen through the eyes of one of China’s greatest poets, Tu Fu). At the center of the book is an ambitious meditation on the Russian ballerina Ulanova, Giselle, and the nature of tragedy. All this gives new dimension and poignance to Bidart’s recurring preoccupation with the human need to leave behind some record or emblem, a made thing that stands, in the face of death, for the possibilities of art.
 
Bidart, winner of the 2007 Bollingen Prize in American Poetry, is widely acknowledged as one of the significant poets of his time. This is perhaps his most accessible, mysterious, and austerely beautiful book.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:26:53 -0400)

A first collection of lyrics by the Bollingen Prize-winning author evaluates the role of imminent mortality in forcing the self to question the relation between actual life and the promise of transformation, in a volume that explores such subjects as Marilyn Monroe, the ballet Giselle, and the nature of tragedy.… (more)

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