HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Big news! LibraryThing is now free to all! Read the blog post and discuss the change on Talk.
dismiss
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

The Anubis Gates by Tim Powers
Loading...

The Anubis Gates (edition 1997)

by Tim Powers

Series: The Anubis Gates (1)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations / Mentions
3,3321042,705 (3.96)2 / 311
The Anubis Gate is the classic time travel novel that took the fantasy world by storm a decade ago. Only the dazzling imagination of Tim Powers could have created such as adventure.
Member:selfnoise
Title:The Anubis Gates
Authors:Tim Powers
Info:Ace Trade (1997), Paperback, 400 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:****1/2
Tags:fantasy, time travel, sf, england, london, egypt

Work details

The Anubis Gates by Tim Powers

  1. 60
    The Digging Leviathan by James P. Blaylock (Scottneumann, Anonymous user)
  2. 50
    On Stranger Tides by Tim Powers (Scottneumann)
  3. 30
    Homunculus by James P. Blaylock (Scottneumann)
  4. 31
    To Say Nothing of the Dog by Connie Willis (Kichererbse)
  5. 10
    The Map of Time by Félix J. Palma (BookshelfMonstrosity)
    BookshelfMonstrosity: The Anubis Gates and The Map of Time blur the line between Science Fiction and Fantasy, presenting intricately plotted time travel stories with a hint of Mystery that feature appearances by 19th-century literary figures alongside more fantastical elements.… (more)
  6. 00
    The Emerald Burrito of Oz by John Skipp (Scottneumann)
  7. 23
    Jonathan Strange & Mr. Norrell by Susanna Clarke (LamontCranston)
  8. 02
    Job: A Comedy of Justice by Robert A. Heinlein (Kichererbse)
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

English (101)  Catalan (1)  Spanish (1)  German (1)  All languages (104)
Showing 1-5 of 101 (next | show all)
Re-Read 8/17/16

Well, apparently, the universe doesn't want me to write a review, so let's try this a third time. :)

I wanted to like this re-read a lot more than the first, but unfortunately, the things I thought were uninteresting the first time around, like the Egypt expedition, were still uninteresting, but I stuck around because all the run-ins with the egyptian magicians was still pretty damn wonderful.

As for the first half of the novel, I'd easily give it 5 stars. I mean, where else can you see some unknown poet scholar of Coleridge and an even more unknown poet by the name of Ashbless turn into a time-travelling, swashbuckling hero able to make mortal enemies of near-immortal Egyptian wizards, and do it all the while in 1810 London for 35 more years?

The details and the plot and the funny bits are absolutely great. I like Doyle before and after his transformation into an orange ape, too. :) Perhaps more after his transformation. I love Dog-Face Joe, the body-switching werewolf, all the dirty streets of London, and practically every single enemy in the book. So many of them had other sides to them and evil is not absolute. :)

I still regard this book very highly, especially for the ideas, the wonderful ideas, the surprising magic system, the awesome time travel problems and its clever solutions. Even the writing is clear and interesting well past the middle part, and there was nothing in it to really turn me off about it except, perhaps, that it was too light and too action-y? I don't know. I didn't feel very invested. It turned around again, of course, and the ending was very satisfying, but not enough to knock this book up to a 5 where my *mind* thinks it should be, but my *heart* refuses to budge.


Old Review:

I was surprised to find a novel that was much more complicated and rich than I might have otherwise expected. I knew this was a time travel book, and I knew there would be magic in it. I didn't expect it to be forerunner of the steampunk movement or to be so literary. Mr. Powers put a lot of consideration into the lives portrayed here, and while Doyle was hard to truly love, he grew on me as he grew as a character. I really liked him by the end. There are many twists and turns to the story, and the plot is both intricate and complex.
The novel is in third-persion limited omniscience, which allows for a great deal of variety, while sacrificing the immediacy and the feeling of being in the character's skin. I almost wish it was written in first-person, because the sheer amount of detail and description in 1810 London was astounding and beautiful in the horrible way those grubby English types can be, and feeling what he felt would have been an extraordinary treat.
This is no urban fantasy novel. The magic was strange and had some very curious aspects to it, and pitting a magical viewpoint with a time-traveler in a closed-loop system felt like a stroke a of genius.

I have to say that the novel, while sometimes slow, was well thought-out and complex. I think it succeeded as a traditional fantasy novel, a traditional science-fiction novel, and also as a traditional horror novel in equal parts. I may be jaded by modern fiction that throws together whichever genres you like to make a goulash that's tasty and strange, or even some science fiction or fantasy that simply draws from the tradition of horror. This novel balances all three and even spares a tithe to mystery, romance, action-adventure, social-commentary a-la Dickens, and poetry. The fact that Mr. Powers pulls it all off is a testament to skill as a writer. ( )
  bradleyhorner | Jun 1, 2020 |
This is a book that generates curiosity, moves along at high speed, fills the imagination with wonder and provides great enjoyment to the reader.

The Author creates all the characters in such a compelling way, even those that play a supporting role that the reader finds themselves wanting more, unfortunately this never comes. A tantalizing amount of time is spent with each of the character, but it is never enough; this leaves the reading feeling they have spent barely enough time with each of them before they are gone. There were simply never enough of these characters, and it left me feeling cheated, and wanting more of them.

One of the problems I found with this novel, and I am not sure if it was intentional on the part of the Author, was there is so much packed into a mere 380 pages. In this small space the reader encounters Beggar's guilds, Egyptian wizards, Romantic poets and business magnates; prize fighters mix with cross dressing vengeance seekers, mad clowns, body snatchers, fire elementals and gypsies. They are subject to time slips that bounce them from 1810 to 1983 to 1660 and back into the 1800’s at such a pace that I felt I needed motion sickness pills to get me through but, despite all this jumping the Author manages to keep the plot following a linear path of cause and effect. On the negative side of all this time jumping there are huge gaps; the story moves on too quickly leaving the reader wanting more of the unfulfilled promise of sweeping and epic adventures. All of this is, however, extremely effective. It makes the reader want to continue through the novel, joining in with the good old fashioned chases. It is also the downfall of this piece of writing.

Being left wanting more can be a good thing, particularly with this kind of high fantasy and fast paced adventure read but, in the case of this novel I found it to be extremely frustrating. To counter this feeling of frustration one of two things could have been done by the Author; either increase the story to match the scale of the book or reduce the epic scale of the book itself, with either of these alterations this book could have become so much more than it is, an entertaining sci-fi fantasy adventure.

In the end this novel is far more time travel than Steampunk and leaves the reader feeling more than a little short-changed and frustrated. Regardless of these shortcomings, reading this book is not a waste of time and I would recommend it to those lovers of the time travel genre and also people who enjoy a good old fashioned adventure story.

Originally reviewed on: http://catesbooknuthut.com/2013/10/18/review-the-anubis-gates-tim-powers/



This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.
( )
  TheAcorn | Nov 8, 2019 |
All time favourite. ( )
  PhilOnTheHill | Sep 8, 2019 |
I think one of these days I would like to read this book versus listening to it. I just got a feel that something was lost in translation from book to voice. I found it oftentimes confusing but mainly there were several scenes that just dragged on and it took a long time for the author to bring the value of the scene together.

The one thing I did like about the book was how difficult it was for the main character to survive in the past. The main character Brendan Doyle isn’t the most likeable main character but I still felt the desire to root for his survival. I did like the mixture of magic with science and how in the past what is magical but not so much in the future.

Some of the side stories don’t seem to have a point to the overarching story and it seems like the Darrow side story is tied up rather quickly just so the author can cross that plot off his list. There is also a feel of “can something for this guy just go right for once” which I dislike in books because it seems like the author is just throwing in obstacles to make the book longer. So given what I liked and disliked I left this book after the end with a feeling of the book just not meeting my expectations so that I is why I gave it 2 stars.

Bronson Pinchot did an okay job of the narration but I would have liked to see some differences in accent, tone or inflection between some of the characters because they gave from different time periods and geographical locations. With all those differences I was expecting something more in the voice narrations.
( )
  TVNerd95 | Jul 6, 2019 |
Time travel, body swapping, Ancient Egyptian blood magic, lycanthropy, mutant beings in the sewers of early 19th C London, and a meeting with Coleridge. Yep, it was Tim Powers time again, and a reread of his classic THE ANUBIS GATES.

The Powers imagination is on full throttle in this one right from the start, and it's a wild ride through the aforementioned tropes, with Powers jugging a variety of characters, plots, sub-plots and timelines in a riotously entertaining romp.

He keeps everything just on the cusp of falling apart into incoherence, driving set piece after set piece at you until you give in, go with the flow and get carried along by the sheer manic exuberance of the thing.

It's a wonderful feat of imagination, a wonderful bit of writing and, in the Zeisling Press hardcover I've got, a wonderfully presented package all round, with an intro by Ramsey Campbel for good measure.

It's a favorite thing of mine, and one I recommend to everyone who asks what I think they should read. So, go and read it if you haven't. It's truly magical.

( )
1 vote williemeikle | Dec 22, 2018 |
Showing 1-5 of 101 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors (19 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Powers, Timprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Bilokur, MarkIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Brautigan, DonCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Burns, JimCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Campbell, RamseyIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Campion, PaulCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Carr, RichardCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Caza, PhilippeCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Keulers, NicoCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Lebec, GérardTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
MacPherson, DonaldCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
McMurray, JacobDesignersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Palumbo, DavidIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Pinchot, BronsonNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Podevin, Jean-FrançoisCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Potter, Jeffrey KCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Riffel, HannesTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Stuyer Sj, M. K.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
To my wife, Serena
First words
From between two trees at the crest of the hill a very old man watched, with a nostalgic longing he thought he'd lost all capacity for, as the last group of picnickers packed up their baskets, mounted their horses, and rode away south...
Quotations
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary
when literature/
crosses with mad science and/
meets ancient magic
(lachapakhan)
An opium dream
or magic-ridden nightmare
recalls "Yesterday"
(paradoxosalpha)

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.96)
0.5 1
1 12
1.5 2
2 53
2.5 20
3 129
3.5 75
4 327
4.5 50
5 280

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 147,853,212 books! | Top bar: Always visible