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The Eclogues (also called the Bucolics) by…
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The Eclogues (also called the Bucolics)

by Virgil

Other authors: See the other authors section.

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  1. 10
    The Idylls by Theocritus (dirkjohnson)
    dirkjohnson: This is the foundation work of the genre in which the Bucolics are placed. Virgil largely copied several of his poems from the Greek of Theocritus.
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» See also 9 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 10 (next | show all)
"When young any composition pleases which unites a little sense, some imagination, and some rhythm, in doses however small. But as we advance in life these things fall off one by one, and I suspect we are left at last with only Homer and Virgil, perhaps Homer alone." - Thomas Jefferson, Thoughts on English Prosody

"[So much] has my relish for poetry deserted me that at present I cannot read Virgil with pleasure." - Thomas Jefferson to John Daly Burk, 21 Jun. 1801 [PTJ 34:400-401]

"and what finer specimens could [the teacher of Latin and Greek] produce & comment on ... in Belles lettres than Homer, Anacreon, Theocritus, Virgil, Horace, Terence & the Greek tragedians, all of them school books?" - Thomas Jefferson to Jason Chamberlain, 1 Jul. 1814 [PTJ:RS 28:447-448]

"I would advise you to undertake a regular course of history & poetry in both languages ... in Latin read Livy, Caesar, Sallust Tacitus, Cicero’s Philosophies, and some of his Orations, in prose; and Virgil, Ovid’s Metamorphoses, Horace, Terence & Juvenal for poetry." - Thomas Jefferson to Francis Eppes, 6 Oct. 1820
  ThomasJefferson | Jul 30, 2014 |
"[So much] has my relish for poetry deserted me that at present I cannot read Virgil with pleasure." - Thomas Jefferson to John Daly Burk, 21 Jun. 1801 [PTJ 34:400-401]

"your Latin & Greek should be kept up assiduously by reading at spare hours: and, discontinuing the desultory reading of the schools. I would advise you to undertake a regular course of history & poetry in both languages ... in Latin read Livy, Caesar, Sallust Tacitus, Cicero’s Philosophies, and some of his Orations, in prose; and Virgil, Ovid’s Metamorphoses, Horace, Terence & Juvenal for poetry." - Thomas Jefferson to Francis Eppes, 6 Oct. 1820
  ThomasJefferson | Jul 15, 2014 |
"When young any composition pleases which unites a little sense, some imagination, and some rhythm, in doses however small. But as we advance in life these things fall off one by one, and I suspect we are left at last with only Homer and Virgil, perhaps Homer alone." - Thomas Jefferson, Thoughts on English Prosody

"[So much] has my relish for poetry deserted me that at present I cannot read Virgil with pleasure." - Thomas Jefferson to John Daly Burk, 21 Jun. 1801 [PTJ 34:400-401]

"and what finer specimens could [the teacher of Latin and Greek] produce & comment on ... in Belles lettres than Homer, Anacreon, Theocritus, Virgil, Horace, Terence & the Greek tragedians, all of them school books?" - Thomas Jefferson to Jason Chamberlain, 1 Jul. 1814 [PTJ:RS 28:447-448]

"I would advise you to undertake a regular course of history & poetry in both languages ... in Latin read Livy, Caesar, Sallust Tacitus, Cicero’s Philosophies, and some of his Orations, in prose; and Virgil, Ovid’s Metamorphoses, Horace, Terence & Juvenal for poetry." - Thomas Jefferson to Francis Eppes, 6 Oct. 1820
  ThomasJefferson | Jun 17, 2014 |
Edition: // Descr: xxviii, 154 p. : ill. 15 cm. // Series: Elementary Classics Call No. { 873 V81 4 c. #1. } Edited, with Notes & Vocabulary, for the Use of Schools, by T.E. Page // //
  ColgateClassics | Oct 26, 2012 |
Edition: // Descr: xxviii, 154 p. : ill. 15 cm. // Series: Elementary Classics Call No. { 873 V81 4 c. #3. } Edited, with Notes & Vocabualry, for the Use of Schools by T.E. Page. // //
  ColgateClassics | Oct 26, 2012 |
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» Add other authors (43 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Virgilprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Bowen, EurosTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Calverley, Charles StuartTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Day Lewis, C.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Deweerdt, RikTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Dolç, MiquelTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
DooremanCover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Everaert, MarnixCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Fowler, Barbara HughesTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Gould, Howard ErnestEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Lee, GuyTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Michie, JamesTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Rieu, E. V.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Rieu, Emile VictorTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Valery, PaulTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Stretched in the shadow of the broad beech, thou rehearsest, Tityrus, on the slender pipe thy woodland music. (Calverley trans.)
Tityrus, lying back beneath wide beechen cover,
you meditate the woodland muse on slender oat. (Lee trans.)
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 014044419X, Paperback)

Haunting and enigmatic, Virgil's "Eclogues" combined a Greek literary form with scenes from contemporary Roman life to create a work that inspired a whole European tradition of pastoral poetry. For despite their rustic setting and the beauty of their phrasing, the poems in Virgil's first collection are also grounded in reality. Shepherds are overwhelmed by the torments of poetic love - but they must also endure such real-life events as the tragic consequences of Julius Caesar's murder in 44 bc and a civil war. In giving unforgettable expression to the disasters of the day through poetry, the "Eclogues" paved the way for the "Georgics" and the "Aeneid", the two greatest works of Latin literature, and are also a major masterpiece in their own right.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:31:11 -0400)

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