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I, Robot by Isaac Asimov
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I, Robot (1950)

by Isaac Asimov

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Showing 1-5 of 152 (next | show all)
I, Robot by Isaac Asimov

★ ★ ★ ★ ½ ♥

I, Robot is an anthology of short stories written by Isaac Asimov between 1940 and 1950. Each story is told by robopsychologist, Susan Calvin, and links the history of robotics.

Even though this book is now over 60 years old, I found it to still be quite relevant. Some sci-fi books lose their touch as time and technology occur but this book does not.

I originally read this book because 1) I liked the movie (note: it turns out the movie is almost nothing like the book, with just snippets from the book found in the movie) and 2) my husband that never reads insisted that I must read this book (and has been insisting for years). I was not disappointed. I really enjoyed this book and all of it's individual stories and characters. It is a fun, easy, yet thoughtful read on robotics and human nature. For those that don't like science fiction – this book may be a good one to try anyway. It is well written and short.

This may be my first Asimov book but it will not be my last. ( )
  UberButter | Feb 9, 2016 |
Interconnected short stories that introduce the Three Laws of Robotics and serve as an excellent introduction to the other robot novels by Asimov. Perhaps dated at times, these stories nevertheless prod us to think and then realize how prescient Asimov truly was back when he wrote them. ( )
  dbsovereign | Jan 26, 2016 |
An interesting examination of potential development of robots and some of the issues that could arise as consciousness is developed under some approximation of the famous 3 Laws of Robotics. ( )
  kale.dyer | Jan 22, 2016 |
Great book! Collection of stories about robots. I really enjoyed all the stories. The movie is a total rip-off. So many good stories they could have used, and made a much better movie. ( )
  AmieB7 | Jan 21, 2016 |
Dr. Susan Calvin, a robopsychologist, ties together 9 short stories about robots while being interviewed. She understands the 'personalities' of robots better than anyone and she knows their brains are capable of much more than their inventors intended. All robots are designed to obey 3 rules which, simply put, are that no robot may harm a human or allow the human to be harmed, robots must obey all orders given by humans unless it conflicts with the first law, and robots must protect themselves unless it conflicts with laws 1 and 2. My favorite story by far was "The Liar" in which it was supposed that Herbie the robot could read humans minds. Herbie was able to reassure the humans that the things they most desired were about to happen. But, were they really? Remember Rule #1. Other stories dealt with robots who became egomaniacs, lost their minds entirely, or liked to pull practical jokes. The last few chapters were very futuristic in that powerful machines controlled the world's economy, mostly with excellent results. It is presumed that some humans, i.e. anti-machine societies, would purposely not follow the machine's suggestions. It is entirely possible that the machines understood human psyche well enough to realize that some people would not follow their suggestions and that the machines designed their programs to offset that possibility. Rather mind-blowing stuff.

For years I have avoided science fiction novels because I just have no interest in space travel, robotics, and all of that confusing math and science. This is the second book this month (the first being "The Martian") that is making me rethink my no sci-fi policy. I may just continue on with Asimov's robot series.
( )
  Ellen_R | Jan 15, 2016 |
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» Add other authors (47 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Isaac Asimovprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Berkey, JohnCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Cartier, EddCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Serra, LauraTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Youll, StephenCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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People/Characters
Important places
Important events
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Epigraph
Dedication
To John W. Campbell, Jr., who godfathered the robots
First words
Robbie:
"Ninety-eight — ninety-nine — one hundred."
Runaround:
It was one of Gregory Powell's favorite platitudes that nothing was to be gained from excitement, so when Mike Donovan came leaping down the stairs toward him, red hair matted with perspiration, Powell frowned.
Reason:
Half a year later, the boys had changed their minds.
Catch That Rabbit:
The vacation was longer than two weeks.
Liar!
Alfred Lanning lit his cigar carefully, but the tips of his fingers were trembling slightly.
Quotations
The Three Laws of Robotics
1. A robot may not injure a human being, or, through inaction, allow a human being to come to harm.
2. A robot must obey the orders given it by human beings except where such orders would conflict with the First Law.
3. A robot must protect its own existence as long as such protection does not conflict with the First or Second Law.
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Amazon.com Amazon.com Review (ISBN 0553294385, Mass Market Paperback)

In this collection, one of the great classics of science fiction, Asimov set out the principles of robot behavior that we know as the Three Laws of Robotics. Here are stories of robots gone mad, mind-reading robots, robots with a sense of humor, robot politicians, and robots who secretly run the world, all told with Asimov's trademark dramatic blend of science fact and science fiction.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:10:51 -0400)

(see all 6 descriptions)

In this collection, one of the great classics of science fiction, Asimov set out the principles of robot behavior that we know as the Three Laws of Robotics. Here are stories of robots gone mad, mind-reading robots, robots with a sense of humor, robot politicians, and robots who secretly run the world, all told with Asimov's trademark dramatic blend of science fact and science fiction.… (more)

» see all 10 descriptions

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