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I, Robot by Isaac Asimov
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I, Robot (original 1950; edition 1968)

by Isaac Asimov

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9,756172296 (3.97)257
Member:xeophin
Title:I, Robot
Authors:Isaac Asimov
Info:Grafton (1968), Edition: reprint, Paperback, 206 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:*****
Tags:None

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I, Robot by Isaac Asimov (1950)

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» See also 257 mentions

English (156)  Spanish (6)  Swedish (2)  French (2)  German (1)  Italian (1)  Dutch (1)  Portuguese (1)  Catalan (1)  Danish (1)  All languages (172)
Showing 1-5 of 156 (next | show all)
This was Isaac Asimov's first collection of robot short stories, first published in magazines during the 1940s and collected into book form in the early 1950s. The stories are linked together through a narrative involving a young journalist interviewing Doctor Susan Calvin, a key figure in the history of early robotics in Asimov's fictional universe. The stories all concern aspects of the Three Laws of Robotics, and the problems they throw up and the issues humans have to face in solving them. This description probably makes them sound a bit dry, but they're good little stories for the most part in the ideas they throw up and the logical paradoxes that form their bases, though some of the characters, especially Powell and Donovan, who feature in many of them, come across as rather ludicrous and stereotyped from a modern viewpoint. This is a classic collection of stories in the genre, from the era often called the Golden Era of science fiction, when the magazines containing such stories as these prevailed over full length novels. ( )
  john257hopper | Jun 21, 2016 |
At first, I thought this was a novel. However, I realize now it's really a connected collection of short stories. A lot of interesting thought goes into this book. I did have to continually remind myself that it was written in the 1940s. It is intriguing to try to problem solve the "Three Laws of Robotics" alongside the characters. ( )
  EllsbethB | Jun 4, 2016 |
I neither strongly disliked nor strongly liked anything in this book. It was certainly an easy read with the author moving the reader along the plot line via various short stories regarding the evolving relationship of man to robot. But I never found myself enraptured by the story; I was just reading to read. That's not to say Asimov is a poor writer. I just wasn't compelled by the overarching narrative of I, Robot.

If you're looking for an enjoyable weekend read, this is not a bad one to consider. It's a solid 3-3.5 stars. ( )
  codyacunningham | May 9, 2016 |
Interesting little book, if out of date. And apparently the movie (hyped on my edition's cover) is nothing like the book. My dad had seen the movie but never read the book (I was shocked!), and we were talking about two different stories.

So this is neat in that it is a set of short stories (or incidents) revolving around Susan Calvin, robopsychologist at US Robotics, around the turn of the 21st century. She is talking to a reporter after her retirement, and explaining incidents where the robots' interpretations of the laws of robotics caused them to do things no one predicted or understood. She was often brought in to figure out and solve the problems.

Interesting, but odd to weird about AI/robots that are not at all like what we ended up with.

Now, back to the cover of my edition. Will Smith, from the movie, and the line "One Man Saw It Coming". That has absolutely nothing to do with the book. ( )
  Dreesie | Apr 12, 2016 |
Don't remember much about it. Although a story with robots riding excercize machine seems to ring a bell. Or was that some other story? ( )
  ndpmcIntosh | Mar 21, 2016 |
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» Add other authors (46 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Isaac Asimovprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Berkey, JohnCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Brick, ScottNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Cartier, EddCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Serra, LauraTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Youll, StephenCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Important events
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Epigraph
Dedication
To John W. Campbell, Jr., who godfathered the robots
First words
Robbie:
"Ninety-eight — ninety-nine — one hundred."
Runaround:
It was one of Gregory Powell's favorite platitudes that nothing was to be gained from excitement, so when Mike Donovan came leaping down the stairs toward him, red hair matted with perspiration, Powell frowned.
Reason:
Half a year later, the boys had changed their minds.
Catch That Rabbit:
The vacation was longer than two weeks.
Liar!
Alfred Lanning lit his cigar carefully, but the tips of his fingers were trembling slightly.
Quotations
The Three Laws of Robotics
1. A robot may not injure a human being, or, through inaction, allow a human being to come to harm.
2. A robot must obey the orders given it by human beings except where such orders would conflict with the First Law.
3. A robot must protect its own existence as long as such protection does not conflict with the First or Second Law.
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Disambiguation notice
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Amazon.com Amazon.com Review (ISBN 0553294385, Mass Market Paperback)

In this collection, one of the great classics of science fiction, Asimov set out the principles of robot behavior that we know as the Three Laws of Robotics. Here are stories of robots gone mad, mind-reading robots, robots with a sense of humor, robot politicians, and robots who secretly run the world, all told with Asimov's trademark dramatic blend of science fact and science fiction.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:10:51 -0400)

(see all 6 descriptions)

In this collection, one of the great classics of science fiction, Asimov set out the principles of robot behavior that we know as the Three Laws of Robotics. Here are stories of robots gone mad, mind-reading robots, robots with a sense of humor, robot politicians, and robots who secretly run the world, all told with Asimov's trademark dramatic blend of science fact and science fiction.… (more)

(summary from another edition)

» see all 10 descriptions

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