HomeGroupsTalkMoreZeitgeist
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

A Room of One's Own (1929)

by Virginia Woolf

Other authors: See the other authors section.

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
9,955130517 (4.12)491
In A Room of One's Own, Virginia Woolf imagines that Shakespeare had a sister: a sister equal to Shakespeare in talent, equal in genius, but whose legacy is radically different.This imaginary woman never writes a word and dies by her own hand, her genius unexpressed. But if only she had found the means to create, urges Woolf, she would have reached the same heights as her immortal sibling. In this classic essay, Virginia Woolf takes on the establishment, using her gift of language to dissect the world around her and give a voice to those who have none. Her message is simple: A woman must have a fixed income and a room of her own in order to have the freedom to create. Annotated and with an introduction by Susan Gubar… (more)
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 491 mentions

English (117)  Spanish (2)  Catalan (2)  Swedish (2)  Italian (2)  Dutch (1)  French (1)  German (1)  Norwegian (1)  All languages (129)
Showing 1-5 of 117 (next | show all)
Although this book is nearly one hundred years old, it could still change someone's life, woman or man. Virginia Woolf was an amazing writer, and I wish I could show her the world today--it's not perfect, but it's better. ( )
  littlebookjockey | Sep 15, 2020 |
A mess of one’s one. That’s it. The sum total of my ambition. No wild pipe dream like a whole room, just a little bit of a room that is mine and I’ll know it is mine because it will have MY mess on it. I lived for a long time with a person who was a compulsive cleaner and tidier. He would occasionally tell me that I should tidy my desk but never would he touch it. He might have hated it, but it was my mess and he had no rights over it whatsoever. This never had to be discussed, it was simply obvious. Like not opening other people’s mail, and I’m sure there must be others. At any rate, one of those things that is so obviously taboo it is permanently unstated.

The point is, when you come right down to it, whatever the mess looks like to you, the third party in this equation, it means something totally different to me. It isn’t a mess, it is a completely meaningful thing. One person’s mess is another person’s carefully catalogued pile of – stuff.

Of course, having said that, if I could graduate to a whole room of my own that would be better, Virginia. I grant you that.
( )
  bringbackbooks | Jun 16, 2020 |
An interesting view from one of the twentieth centuries great writers. Woolf who never shied away from doing things differently again pushes the limits for her time. Woolf who was lucky enough to have a room of her own and a source of income looks at the past and her present and offers some thoughts. What if Shakespeare had an equally talented sister? Would we know her or would she have been married off or a servant? She also writes as a female narrator who explores the role of women writers for part of the book. She mentions a lesbian couple and follows up with a don't be surprised or embarrassed: it is ok these things do happen. Perhaps a tip of the hat to Radclyffe Hall.
An interesting look at how things change over time and how little things change over time. Probably the most quoted Woolf work. ( )
  evil_cyclist | Mar 16, 2020 |
While some of the views seem dated, there is a lot that has not changed for women writers. At a time when there were many encumbrances for women writers, Woolf encouraged women to write and tried to show a path to how to do that. ( )
  RebeccaDHarlingue | Feb 18, 2020 |
Holy crudsticks, I first read aRoOO, as my class called it, in tenth grade as part of the required reading list, and I gave it a measly one star. I don't know what it was back then that made me so unreceptive to its message - perhaps my desire to get it over and done with or my intent on "speed-reading" it.

Whatever it was, this time, just a tiny bit older and the teensy bit wiser, each line spoke out, every word (past the first chapter) had such a significant purpose. I'd recommend a very slow and close reading of the text, to really savour and enjoy all its little moments of genius and "nuggets" of truth, that collectively, and post-interpretation, create such an empowering perspective on writing, sex and the individual experience. This is a must read for any aspiring female writer, as well as any non-aspiring, non-female, non-writer. Anyone and everyone. Take it slow. Have Woolf pronounce each word to you in your head as she sits across from you.

The first chapter is the most dislikable in my opinion. It's full of fluttery natural imagery, which is, of course, not a bad thing, but this chapter is consumed by the reality that contrasts the great hypothetical thinking that is really the crux of aRoOO. It's slightly on the boring side and the tone is a little pretentious, which may have been what affected Year 10 me to dismiss the text altogether. But the text has persuaded me that even this chapter is beautiful, it sets a more calming backdrop and illustrates the various disturbances in a woman's life. There's an underlying irony to it (of writing effeminately) that is wonderfully weaved into this text - if I had heard this as a lecture, I would've been sure to miss it, as shown by my first read.

Everything from chapter two to five is enlightening and what I feel to be the real "meat" of the book. Woolf uses that masculine side to write confidently and without reservation to write for the sake of writing. As her last chapter describes, this feminine and masculine writer combines in this mess of self-correction and confidence that effectively notes the various circumstances to produce a great writer, and questions what we once took for granted in the domains of art, writing and sex - a truly modern classic. I can't relay her ramblings and articulations effectively to anyone, the wealth of points to ponder buzz around in my head, overwhelming, and infinitely more than I can effectively describe. What I'm trying to say is: read it for yourself. Take it slow and you'll love it.

The last chapter, six, is the real bow tied on top. It has a subtle humour to it, not one that I'm willing to restrict and divide by describing it as "intellectual". It perfectly adds some final notes to think about and concludes an essay such as this with a strong empowering message, not just for women despite her "you's" seeming to refer to them, but for any reader with an inclination to reason and challenge (not Year 10 me, evidently). ( )
  kam14505 | Dec 3, 2019 |
Showing 1-5 of 117 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors (66 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Woolf, Virginiaprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Aspesi, NataliaIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Beeke, AnthonCover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Bell, VanessaCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Bradshaw, DavidEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Clarke, Stuart N.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Del Serra, MauraTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Gordon, MaryForewordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Gubar, SusanEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Pearson, DavidCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Simonsuuri, KirstiTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Stevenson, JulietNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Valentí, HelenaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Waals-Nachenius, C.E. van derTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
This essay is based upon two papers read to the Arts Society at Newnham and the Odtaa at Girton in October 1928. The papers were too long to be read in full, and have since been altered and expanded.
Dedication
First words
But, you may say, we asked you to speak about women and fiction -- what has that got to do with a room of one's own? I will try to explain.
Quotations
A woman must have money and a room of her own if she is to write fiction
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (2)

In A Room of One's Own, Virginia Woolf imagines that Shakespeare had a sister: a sister equal to Shakespeare in talent, equal in genius, but whose legacy is radically different.This imaginary woman never writes a word and dies by her own hand, her genius unexpressed. But if only she had found the means to create, urges Woolf, she would have reached the same heights as her immortal sibling. In this classic essay, Virginia Woolf takes on the establishment, using her gift of language to dissect the world around her and give a voice to those who have none. Her message is simple: A woman must have a fixed income and a room of her own in order to have the freedom to create. Annotated and with an introduction by Susan Gubar

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (4.12)
0.5 3
1 13
1.5 1
2 68
2.5 13
3 256
3.5 54
4 616
4.5 80
5 670

Penguin Australia

5 editions of this book were published by Penguin Australia.

Editions: 0141183535, 0141018984, 0141044888, 0141198540, 0734306555

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 151,573,012 books! | Top bar: Always visible