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The Door in the Hedge by Robin McKinley
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The Door in the Hedge (1981)

by Robin McKinley

Other authors: See the other authors section.

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
1,584266,979 (3.73)51
  1. 30
    Beauty: A Retelling of the Story of Beauty and the Beast by Robin McKinley (ncgraham)
    ncgraham: The obvious recommendation ... can't think why LT didn't provide it!
  2. 10
    Wildwood Dancing by Juliet Marillier (Jen7waters)
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» See also 51 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 24 (next | show all)
Absolutely beautifully rewritten and expanded classic fairy tales. Expands on the air of wonder and mystery with delicately flowing pictures of scenes and people. Featured by the NYPL on its e-book website and I can see why. I've loved McKinley's fantasy novels before but this is special. Thanks NYPL. ( )
  abycats | May 11, 2018 |
Robin McKinley’s strong suit is not short stories. Her books usually start off slow and take a while to warm up and become interesting, and with short stories, that sort of thing just doesn’t work out as well. While the stories themselves had interesting plots, the way McKinley writes most of them is plodding, to say the least. The first story kept losing my interest, but I know how her writing works, so I continued on, regardless of how bored I was from her initial set-up. With that said, however, the first story is by far the weakest and the stories only get stronger and more interesting as the book moves along, which I really appreciated. Well done on whoever created the chronology for this anthology, because the best stories were put last, so there was only buildup and things to look forward to rather than reading a great story at first and then getting disappointed by the next one.

I’m a huge fan of fairy tales, which is part of the reason why I picked up this book. I very much enjoyed the retelling of the Princess and the Frog. While predictable, it was still an interesting twist on the original tale, and I absolutely LOVED the twelve dancing princesses retelling. It could have been several pages shorter, but it was overall quite well done.

Basically, this is great if you’re a fan of fairy tales and Robin McKinley. It takes a lot to to get through the set ups of most of the stories, but they do have some sort of payoff that I felt was worthwhile. It’s not amazing by any means, nor are these particular retellings must-reads, but they’re great if you’re in need for a fairy tale fix.

Also posted on Purple People Readers. ( )
1 vote sedelia | Jul 18, 2017 |
The Stolen Princess : 2 stars. Slow-going.
The Princess and the Frog: 2.5. Wish it had been longer. More Lian-as-frog scenes, and a more dramatic magical showdown.
The Hunting of the Hind: 2.5 stars. I like how the quiet, cast aside sister saves her Prince brother.
The Twelve Dancing Princesses: 3 stars. Decent retelling of a familiar tale. Not too clear though how exactly the spell was broken. ( )
  mrsrobin | Jun 24, 2017 |
A foray into "Faeryland"; stolen princesses, talking frogs and the interface between "our world" and that other one (that lurks). A retelling of older stories that have been around in our myths 'forever'. ( )
  SandyAMcPherson | Jun 19, 2017 |
Typical Mckinley short story collection. Very enjoyably written gentle faerie tales featuring the common sorts of themes - dancing shoes, missing babies and the like. The frog/prince one is twisted wonderfully even though you know it's coming. There's nothing intense here, no peril, little drama, just quiet romance, picturesque countryside, and people living their lives as princes and princesses as best they can - amongst the manipulations of the fae.

Short but enjoyable. ( )
1 vote reading_fox | Jul 21, 2016 |
Showing 1-5 of 24 (next | show all)
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Robin McKinleyprimary authorall editionscalculated
Craft, Kinuko Y.Cover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Information from the Russian Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.
Epigraph
Dedication
This book is dedicated to the memory of my grandfathers: Albert Turrell, who told me stories even more wonderful than those I could find in Andrew Lang, and Thomas McKinley, who was a soldier and fought for a Queen
First words
The last mortal kingdom before the unmeasured sweep of Faerieland begins has at best held an uneasy truce with its unpredictable neighbour.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Someone is trying to add this to McKinley's Damar series, but really they're not connected at all.
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Book description
Includes: The stolen princess - The princess and the frog - The hunting of the hind - The twelve dancing princesses.
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0698119606, Paperback)

Master storyteller Robin McKinley here spins two new fairy tales and retells two cherished classics. All feature princesses touched with or by magic. There is Linadel, who lives in a kingdom next to Faerieland, where princesses are stolen away on their seventeenth birthdays-and Linadel's seventeenth birthday is tomorrow. And Korah, whose brother is bewitched by the magical Golden Hind; now it is up to her to break the spell. Rana must turn to a talking frog to help save her kingdom from the evil Aliyander. And then there are the twelve princesses, enspelled to dance through the soles of their shoes every night. . . . These are tales to read with delight!

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:12:21 -0400)

(see all 4 descriptions)

Master storyteller Robin McKinley here spins two new fairy tales and retells two cherished classics. All feature princesses touched with or by magic. There is Linadel, who lives in a kingdom next to Faerieland, where princesses are stolen away on their seventeenth birthdays-and Linadel's seventeenth birthday is tomorrow. And Korah, whose brother is bewitched by the magical Golden Hind; now it is up to her to break the spell. Rana must turn to a talking frog to help save her kingdom from the evil Aliyander. And then there are the twelve princesses, enspelled to dance through the soles of their shoes every night. These are tales to read with delight! Annotation. A master storyteller spins two new fairy tales and retells two cherished classics--each featuring princesses and magic--in this single volume.… (more)

» see all 4 descriptions

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