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Serve the People: A Stir-Fried Journey…
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Serve the People: A Stir-Fried Journey Through China (original 2008; edition 2009)

by Jen Lin-Liu

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131892,561 (3.61)6
Member:styraciflua
Title:Serve the People: A Stir-Fried Journey Through China
Authors:Jen Lin-Liu
Info:Mariner Books (2009), Edition: Reprint, Paperback, 352 pages
Collections:About Food
Rating:****
Tags:None

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Serve the People: A Stir-Fried Journey Through China by Jen Lin-Liu (2008)

  1. 00
    Sweet Mandarin: The Courageous True Story of Three Generations of Chinese Women and Their Journey from East to West by Helen Tse (cransell)
  2. 00
    River Town: Two Years on the Yangtze by Peter Hessler (cransell)
    cransell: Another look at the experiences of a Westerner living in China. Lin-Liu thanks Hessler in her book, so it's interesting to have read both authors.
  3. 00
    The Fortune Cookie Chronicles: Adventures in the World of Chinese Food by Jennifer Lee (cransell)
    cransell: A look at Chinese food outside of China.
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» See also 6 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 8 (next | show all)
This was a fascinating book, though my experience of it was a bit jumbled because the edition I had was missing pages. Every now and then I'd come across a passage that didn't make sense, only to discover that 2 or 3 pages were missing. But aside from that, I really enjoyed reading the author's experiences in different culinary environments in China. It's fascinating to read about the food culture of another country, and this book does not disappoint. Plus, recipes are sprinkled throughout the book, just enough so you can get the sense of the food she's describing, but not enough to make this a "cookbook". ( )
  sbloom42 | May 21, 2014 |
A young Chinese American woman takes cooking classes and serves apprenticeships in a noodle shop and a high-end restaurant - an inside look at Chinese food, restaurants and culture ( )
  PennyMck | Jan 24, 2014 |
This is the world's longest Vogue or Vanity Fair article. You know the kind -- the author talks about how she is Totally Fascinated By Something, The Something's Personal Meaning to Her, and goes off on a Quest to Discover the Something. In this case, the Something is Chinese food, and I give Lin-Liu credit for learning a king hell of a lot. The recipes in this sound delicious. But while this is more aware of its author's privilege than most Vogue/Vanity Fair articles ("yes, $gazillion is a lot to pay for something that only I would ever see. But the peace of mind I have from knowing that I $insert-spurious-reasoning-here makes it worth it."), that does not mean it is not ultimately superficial and disappointing. It's not bad enough that I decided not to finish it, but it's in no way good enough to recommend as a reading experience. ( )
  cricketbats | Mar 30, 2013 |
Nonfiction journey through China, learning how to cook all the various ways China allows. Interesting, but kind of slow.
  omnia_mutantur | Dec 4, 2011 |
A wonderful approach to a personal story. The writer journeys to China and instead of pursuing her journalistic writing, she becomes interested in learning to cook Chinese food. With each new cooking experience, she learns about a different side of Chinese life. From the elderly cooking tutor who has lived through the cultural revolution, the young girls from the countryside who've moved to the city to work as waitresses, to owners of completely different restaurants, one an ordinary noodle restaurant another a chef who is a rising star on the international scene, each has a story to tell. And if you are brave enough, you can try out the real Chinese way of cooking. ( )
  joyharmon | Aug 19, 2009 |
Showing 1-5 of 8 (next | show all)
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0151012911, Hardcover)

A memorable and mouthwatering cook’s tour of today’s China

 

As a freelance journalist and food writer living in Beijing, Jen Lin-Liu already had a ringside seat for China’s exploding food scene. When she decided to enroll in a local cooking school—held in an unheated classroom with nary a measuring cup in sight—she jumped into the ring herself. Progressing from cooking student to noodle-stall and dumpling-house apprentice to intern at a chic Shanghai restaurant, she finds poor young men and women streaming in from the provinces in search of a “rice bowl” (living wage); a burgeoning urban middle class hungry for luxury after decades of turmoil and privation; and the mentors who take her in hand in the kitchen and beyond. Together they present an unforgettable slice of contemporary China in the full swing of social and economic transformation.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:43:05 -0400)

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