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The Word of God: Or, Holy Writ Rewritten by…
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The Word of God: Or, Holy Writ Rewritten (2008)

by Thomas M. Disch

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Showing 4 of 4
It's difficult to categorize this Disch book, other than to say it is hilarious, insightful and very well-written. ( )
  nmele | Apr 6, 2013 |
This book reads like a collection of short stories interspersed with personal commentary or, should I say, personal commentary interspersed with a few short stories. The conceit of naming himself God works as both a biographical and literary framework. Some may wonder if they really need or want to know so much about the author himself but I thought it worked perfectly as a "blog in print" and I'm not a big blog fan. My favorite piece: The other God and St. Peter visit earth to view Mel Gibson's "Passion of the Christ." Elsewhere, one of my favorite writers appears as a recurring character. Don't read this book if you are overly religious or don't like to think. ( )
  dw0rd | Jul 15, 2009 |
This book reads like a collection of short stories interspersed with personal commentary or, should I say, personal commentary interspersed with a few short stories. The conceit of naming himself God works as both a biographical and literary framework. Some may wonder if they really need or want to know so much about the author himself but I thought it worked perfectly as a "blog in print" and I'm not a big blog fan. My favorite piece: The other God and St. Peter visit earth to view Mel Gibson's "Passion of the Christ." Elsewhere, one of my favorite writers appears as a recurring character. Don't read this book if you are overly religious or don't like to think. ( )
  edecklund | Jul 15, 2009 |
Reading this book just after Disch's suicide is an odd experience. It gives his usual emotionally cool style an oddly hectoring tone, as if to say: enjoy these bits and pieces -- because I'm dead! Appreciate my poetry -- because I'm dead! Continue reading as a steadily more pointless piece about PKD in hell takes over the book -- because I'm dead!

Who knows what I'd think of it otherwise. Since it involves the rape of Disch's mother by a felon, leading to his birth (as part of his burlesque Christlike self-deification), I'd probably think its nastiness-to-genius ratio was over the usual limit that makes most Disch works well worth reading. ( )
  rpuchalsky | Jul 28, 2008 |
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Reveals the details of Thomas M. Disch's sudden elevation to Godhood, a role he takes on after wearying of the world's religious schisms, doctrinal heresies, and manifold sins.

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