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Rose Daughter by Robin McKinley
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Rose Daughter (original 1997; edition 1998)

by Robin McKinley

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2,078393,190 (3.91)132
Member:amaryann21
Title:Rose Daughter
Authors:Robin McKinley
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Rose Daughter by Robin McKinley (1997)

  1. 70
    Beauty: A Retelling of the Story of Beauty and the Beast by Robin McKinley (infiniteletters, Hollerama)
    infiniteletters: An earlier version of the same tale by the same author. Both excellent.
    Hollerama: Beauty was Robin McKinley's first retelling of Beauty and the Beast. Beauty is superior to Rose Daughter, however.
  2. 40
    East by Edith Pattou (infiniteletters)
  3. 20
    Toads and Diamonds by Heather Tomlinson (Aerrin99)
    Aerrin99: An excellent fairy tale retelling set in an India-like world.
  4. 10
    The Fire Rose by Mercedes Lackey (infiniteletters)
    infiniteletters: A spin on the classic tale, with elemental magic and 19th-century San Francisco.
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» See also 132 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 39 (next | show all)
I think I enjoyed her first one better, but this is still a pretty good re-telling of my favorite fairytale. ( )
  Mirandalg14 | Aug 18, 2014 |
An interesting take on the fairy tale, but only partly satisfying. I found the pace of the book disconcerting, with snippets of information about the mystery of the Beast parceled out very intermittently until the last part of the book. At that point the revelations are piled on one after another with blinding speed, and the climax follows fast on their heels with hardly any time allowed to grasp what's going on. I did like the characters and appreciate the fact that everyone -- not just Beauty -- finds his or her talent and a happy place in the world, but it doesn't quite compensate for the pace of the storytelling itself. ( )
  bostonian71 | Feb 25, 2014 |
Fun fact: I always confuse the names Robin McKinley and Patricia McKillip. Not so much the writing, mind.

This is a perfectly competent retelling of Beauty and the Beast. It does some nice stuff with the care of roses as plot-and-symbolism. And I loved the fleshing out of her sisters and their lives.

Unfortunately the novel feels a bit like the author noted down the plot points from the fairy tale as goalposts and wrote the rest of the novel in between them: there's a certain disconnect. I'm reading along this perfectly nice story about Beauty and her sisters and "Oops, time for their father to go on a journey and ask what they want him to bring back and she says a rose." Or this perfectly nice story about Beauty with roses and things in the castle and "Oops, time for him to give her the rose and the speech about how when its petals have all fallen he'll be dead." The parts just don't blend as organically as they ought. ( )
  zeborah | Jun 5, 2013 |
Beauty was better. ( )
  Meganelise1 | Apr 12, 2013 |
I'm not sure which of McKinley's [b:Beauty and the Beast|41424|Beauty A Retelling of the Story of Beauty and the Beast|Robin McKinley|http://photo.goodreads.com/books/1294192311s/41424.jpg|2321285] tellings I like better. I liked the simplicity of Beauty, but Rose Daughter is a little more grown up, and there's a little more world building, and I went a little deeper into it than with Beauty because it had more depth to go into. I enjoyed a lot of the descriptions and the bits of magic, and the foreshadowing for what actually happened at the end -- although I thought it could have done with more foreshadowing, so that the greenwitch had to do a little less explaining. This lost some of the simplicity of Beauty and the fairytale in general, but it kept enough to keep it firmly in the region of fairy tale, for me.

I liked the very end, that the Beast remained a Beast and that that was the happy ending. That's quite lovely: he doesn't have to change to have the love that he earned as a beast. ( )
  shanaqui | Apr 9, 2013 |
Showing 1-5 of 39 (next | show all)
Ironically, this reworking has disabled the fairy tale, robbing it of tension and meaning, and creating for her readers a less usable enchantment.
 
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To Neil and Tom,
whose absurd idea it was

and in memory of
a little lilac-covered cottage
where I used to live
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Her earliest memory was of waking from the dream.
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0441005837, Mass Market Paperback)

Twenty years ago, Robin McKinley dazzled readers with the power of her novel Beauty. Now this extraordinarily gifted novelist returns to the story of Beauty and the Beast with a fresh perspective, ingenuity, and mature insight.

With Rose Daughter, she presents her finest and most deeply felt work--a compelling, richly imagined, and haunting exploration of the transformative power of love.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:24:21 -0400)

(see all 4 descriptions)

Beauty grows to love the Beast at whose castle she is compelled to stay, and through her love he is released from the curse that had turned him from man to beast. A beautiful retelling of the fairy tale Beauty & the Beast from Newbery Award-winning author Robin McKinley. Twenty years ago, Robin McKinley dazzled readers with the power of her novel Beauty. Now this extraordinarily gifted novelist returns to the story of Beauty and the Beast with a fresh perspective, ingenuity, and mature insight. With Rose Daughter, she presents her finest and most deeply felt work--a compelling, richly imagined, and haunting exploration of the transformative power of love.… (more)

(summary from another edition)

» see all 2 descriptions

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