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Man in the Dark by Paul Auster
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Man in the Dark (2008)

by Paul Auster

Other authors: See the other authors section.

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English (66)  French (5)  Dutch (3)  Spanish (2)  Swedish (2)  Danish (1)  Norwegian (1)  Catalan (1)  Italian (1)  German (1)  All languages (83)
Showing 1-5 of 66 (next | show all)
I've read all of Auster's novels and love his sensibility. This particular one is not his best; the plot is a little rocky, more of the seams show through than usual, but it had enough of his reflective musings about the stories we tell ourselves to keep me with him. Don't start with this one, but definitely read Auster. ( )
  bibleblaster | Jan 23, 2016 |
I do love Paul Auster's writing, but this book was just okay. I'm not sure why he chose to write on the subject of grief and dying, but I thought it came up short on both subjects. ( )
  Judy_Ryfinski | Jan 20, 2016 |
I do love Paul Auster's writing, but this book was just okay. I'm not sure why he chose to write on the subject of grief and dying, but I thought it came up short on both subjects. ( )
  Judy_Ryfinski | Jan 20, 2016 |
I liked this book about families and secrets. I especially liked Brill's imaginary story of a parallel world and how it eventually meets up with reality. ( )
  krin5292 | Apr 30, 2015 |
I am a big Paul Auster fan. I have read most of his novels. The New York Trilogy is an outstanding piece of literature. However, some of Auster's more recent work is very different. It lacks the the same quality. It seems that as Auster ages he feels that he needs to be more prolific and fit as many books as he possibly can in to his life. This has affected the quality of each novel. I still re-read some of his older books and search for the deeper layered meanings/messages within. However, I find that his most recent stories lack structure and as a result the books are forgettable. 'Man in the Dark' is one such novel.

What happened to the man in the story who was charged with killing the Protagonist. He faded away like the man in the room in Oracle Night. We had two stories juxtaposing and one petered out as a damp squib. Why begin it if you can not tie it in nicely with the main story of the Man in the Dark with his daughter and Grand daughter. With a lot more thought this could have been a great book. However, like a lot of Auster's recent work, it was rushed. Quality will last a lot longer and be more appreciated than quantity. ( )
  Fergus_Cooper | Apr 11, 2015 |
Showing 1-5 of 66 (next | show all)
Auster reminds us that each of us looks at existence through story-colored lenses. The world we inhabit is literally shaped by Story. We all have our "life stories," and these govern how we see ourselves and others, how we interpret events and memories and expectations. When our saviors and teachers speak to us about the greatest truths, whether of religion or philosophy, they always speak to us in parables. When artists, or ordinary people, talk about what truly matters, they start and end by telling stories, wonderful, amazing stories—like those in the works of Paul Auster.
 
The “parallel worlds” visited and occupied by an aging intellectual’s troubled mind and heart assume intriguing metafictional form in [this] challenging novel. ... Auster’s lucid prose and masterly command of his tricky narrative’s twists, turns and mirrorings keep us riveted to the pages. ... Probably Auster’s best novel, and a plaintive summa of all [his] books that ... have gone into its making.
added by Roycrofter | editKirkus Reviews (May 1, 2008)
 

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Paul Austerprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Bocchiola, MassimoTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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For David Grossman

and his wife Michal

his son Jonathan

his daughter Ruthi

and in memory of Uri
First words
I am alone in the dark, turning the world around in my head as I struggle through another bout of insomnia, another white night in the great American wilderness.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0805088393, Hardcover)

A new novel with a dark political twist from “one of America’s greats.”*

Man in the Dark is Paul Auster’s brilliant, devastating novel about the many realities we inhabit as wars flame all around us.

Seventy-two-year-old August Brill is recovering from a car accident in his daughter’s house in Vermont. When sleep refuses to come, he lies in bed and tells himself stories, struggling to push back thoughts about things he would prefer to forget—his wife’s recent death and the horrific murder of his granddaughter’s boyfriend, Titus. The retired book critic imagines a parallel world in which America is not at war with Iraq but with itself. In this other America the twin towers did not fall and the 2000 election results led to secession, as state after state pulled away from the union and a bloody civil war ensued. As the night progresses, Brill’s story grows increasingly intense, and what he is so desperately trying to avoid insists on being told. Joined in the early hours by his granddaughter, he gradually opens up to her and recounts the story of his marriage. After she falls asleep, he at last finds the courage to revisit the trauma of Titus’s death.

Passionate and shocking, Man in the Dark is a novel of our moment, a book that forces us to confront the blackness of night even as it celebrates the existence of ordinary joys in a world capable of the most grotesque violence.

*Time Out (Chicago)

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:18:53 -0400)

(see all 2 descriptions)

Seventy-two-year-old August Brill is recovering from a car accident in his daughter's house in Vermont. When sleep refuses to come, he lies in bed and tells himself stories, struggling to push back thoughts about things he would prefer to forget--his wife's recent death and the horrific murder of his granddaughter's boyfriend, Titus. The retired book critic imagines a parallel world in which America is not at war with Iraq but with itself. In this other America the twin towers did not fall and the 2000 election results led to secession, as state after state pulled away from the union and a bloody civil war ensued. As the night progresses, Brill's story grows increasingly intense, and what he is so desperately trying to avoid insists on being told. Joined in the early hours by his granddaughter, he gradually opens up to her and recounts the story of his marriage. After she falls asleep, he at last finds the courage to revisit the trauma of Titus's death.--From publisher description.… (more)

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