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Herland by Charlotte Perkins Gilman
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1,544354,755 (3.39)99
Member:Dirk_P_Broer
Title:Herland
Authors:Charlotte Perkins Gilman
Other authors:Irene Reddish (Cover artist)
Info:London : The Women's Press Ltd (March 1986), Edition: 2nd UK Edition, Mass Market Paperback, 146 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:**
Tags:feminist sf, Science Fiction, women's press sf

Work details

Herland by Charlotte Perkins Gilman (1915)

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English (33)  Finnish (1)  Hungarian (1)  All languages (35)
Showing 1-5 of 33 (next | show all)
"Herland" is, in a way, timeless. Considering how long ago it was written the language and situations can be applied to the modern world quite easily. I've read a lot of reviews on here saying that it isn't relevent to today's world and I think anyone who feels that way isn't really understanding of the feminist movement and the rights women are still fighting for. We may no longer feel we belong to men, but there are most definitely still men on this planet who feel we do. The character of Terry - the womanizing, dominant male - can be found in every bar, club and office in the world. I tutor in my college and the treatment I recieved last week from a male I was tutoring was definitely reflective of the gender bias and discrimination that still exists, and the power of the male ego.

The ending:

I took away a star because this book definitely could have been better. The language, though beautiful, was excessive at points. The foreshadowing suggested a much more climactic ending, and that just didn't happen. ( )
  KRaySaulis | Aug 13, 2014 |
There is a lot to like about this book. First, it focuses on a society where women have been living together for thousands of years without war, poverty, jealousy, or disease. (And they somehow worked out the whole birth thing.)

What's more to love is how Gillman did it. The narrator is a man. A man who is recounting his beautiful year in Herland.

The only thing I feel this book is missing is what Ellador felt when introduced to our 'civilized' world. That would be a good book, but strays from the points Gillman was trying to make about our society: boo paternalism, question religion, equal rights, war is bad, use your brain, capitalism is bad/socialism is good.

With all of those themes: me gusta. ( )
  csweder | Jul 8, 2014 |
There is a lot to like about this book. First, it focuses on a society where women have been living together for thousands of years without war, poverty, jealousy, or disease. (And they somehow worked out the whole birth thing.)

What's more to love is how Gillman did it. The narrator is a man. A man who is recounting his beautiful year in Herland.

The only thing I feel this book is missing is what Ellador felt when introduced to our 'civilized' world. That would be a good book, but strays from the points Gillman was trying to make about our society: boo paternalism, question religion, equal rights, war is bad, use your brain, capitalism is bad/socialism is good.

With all of those themes: me gusta. ( )
  csweder | Jul 8, 2014 |
I gave up on this book 3/4 of the way through it. It was far too didactic. Maybe it was enlightening for the time it was written, but from a 21st century perspective it just reads as condescending. ( )
  sbloom42 | May 21, 2014 |
"If they were only younger," he muttered between his teeth. "What on earth is a fellow to say to a regiment of old Colonels like this?"
In all our discussions and speculations we had always unconsciously assumed that the women, whatever else they might be, would be young. Most men do think that way, I fancy.
"Woman" in the abstract is young, and, we assume, charming. As they get older they pass off the stage, somehow, into private ownership mostly, or out of it altogether. But these good ladies were very much on the stage, and yet any one of them might have been a grandmother.
We looked for nervousness—there was none.
For terror, perhaps—there was none.
For uneasiness, for curiosity, for excitement—and all we saw was what might have been a vigilance committee of women doctors, as cool as cucumbers, and evidently meaning to take us to task for being there.


Herland could have been quite dull if the dreadful Terry hadn't been there to provide some humour. ( )
  isabelx | Feb 16, 2014 |
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This is written from memory, unfortunately.
Charlotte Perkins Gilman is not ordinarily thought of as a humorist, but her feminist utopia, Herland, is a very funny book. (Introduction)
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0394736656, Paperback)

On the eve of World War I, an all-female society is discovered somewhere in the distant reaches of the earth by three male explorers who are now forced to re-examine their assumptions about women's roles in society.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:30:56 -0400)

(see all 5 descriptions)

One the eve of WWI, three American male explorers stumble onto an all-female society somewhere in the distant reaches of the earth. Unable to believe their eyes, they promptly set out to find some men, convinced that since this is a civilized country--there must be men. So begins this sparkling utopian novel, a romp through a whole world "masculine" and "feminine", as on target today as when it was written 65 years ago.… (more)

(summary from another edition)

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