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Six Degrees: The Science of a Connected Age (original 2003; edition 2004)

by Duncan J. Watts

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6691114,333 (3.73)5
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Title:Six Degrees: The Science of a Connected Age
Authors:Duncan J. Watts
Info:W. W. Norton & Company (2004), Edition: Reprint, Paperback, 384 pages
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Six Degrees: The Science of a Connected Age by Duncan J. Watts (2003)

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» See also 5 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 11 (next | show all)
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  ronchan | Nov 14, 2016 |
This book is a very good introduction to the fascinating world of networked systems - from social groups to computer networks. Why does success breed success in some systems? What does it look like in measurable terms? How do people find information in a social network? I found this book fascinating and I appreciated that it never oversimplified what is a complex topic. I never got Malcolm Gladwelled.
  harrda | Feb 13, 2012 |
A look at the maths behind the idea that there are 'six degreees of separation' and other networking theories. Interesting stuff and I like the fact that the author is not afraid to include plenty of graphs to illustrate his ideas, popular science books that insist on using only words drive me nuts. ( )
  nocto | Dec 13, 2010 |
A look at the maths behind the idea that there are 'six degreees of separation' and other networking theories. Interesting stuff and I like the fact that the author is not afraid to include plenty of graphs to illustrate his ideas, popular science books that insist on using only words drive me nuts. ( )
  nocto | Dec 13, 2010 |
Aleks Krotoski, broadcaster, journalist, and academic specialising in technology and interactivity, has chosen to discuss Duncan J Watts’s Six Degrees: The Science of a Connected Age on FiveBooks as one of the top five on her subject - Virtual Living, saying that: 



"...Watts has been looking at the small world phenomenon to identify whether the web itself has shrunk our world, and in fact it hasn’t… We still do have those six degrees of separation, even by e-mail, with somebody who’s in, say, Brazil. When it comes down to it, ultimately we do still have the same number of friends and the same number of connections between two points in the world..."


The full interview is available here: http://five-books.com/interviews/aleks-krotoski ( )
  FiveBooks | Mar 17, 2010 |
Showing 1-5 of 11 (next | show all)
I would recommend Watts's book to Technology and Culture readers seeking an introduction to this new field for themselves or for their students.
added by Katya0133 | editTechnology & Culture, Greg Downey
 
Watts's technical descriptions are solid and clear, but the personal narrative feels forced and is generally superfluous.
added by Katya0133 | editNew Scientist, David Cohen
 
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Amazon.com Amazon.com Review (ISBN 0393325423, Paperback)

You may be only six degrees away from Kevin Bacon, but would he let you borrow his car? It depends on the structures within the network that links you. When the power goes out, when we find that a stranger knows someone we know, when dot-com stocks soar in price, networks are evident. In Six Degrees, sociologist Duncan Watts examines networks like these: what they are, how they're being studied, and what we can use them for. To illustrate the often complicated mathematics that describe such structures, Watts uses plenty of examples from life, without which this book would quickly move beyond a general science readership. Small chapters make each thought-provoking conclusion easy to swallow, though some are hard to digest. For instance, in a short bit on "coercive externalities," Watts sums up sociological research showing that:

"Conversations concerning politics displayed a consistent pattern .... On election day, the strongest predictor of electoral success was not which party an individual privately supported but which party he or she expected would win."

Six Degrees attempts to help readers understand the new and exciting field of networks and complexity. While considerably more demanding than a general book like The Tipping Point, it offers readers a snapshot of a riveting moment in science, when understanding things like disease epidemics and the stock market seems almost within our reach. --Therese Littleton

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:13:22 -0400)

(see all 4 descriptions)

An architect of network theory summarizes his team's endeavor to create a blueprint of the world's networks, citing the scientific elements of the Internet, economies, terrorist organizations, and other knowledge-based groups.

(summary from another edition)

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