HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Hell Bent by William G. Tapply
Loading...
MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
11120108,775 (3.76)6

None.

None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 6 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 20 (next | show all)
Evie has left Brady for California to take care of her dying father, but she left no firm commitment to return, so Brady is left with his dog and townhouse. He’s visited in the office by Alexandra a former squeeze. (don’t modern characters manage any kind of longevity in their relationships - except perhaps for Steve Carella who doesn’t look so modern anymore. Thank goodness for Carl Houseman.) Alex wants Brady to handle the divorce of her brother a well-known photographer -- a non-embedded one -- whose wife has left him and is now suffering from the loss of his right hand and PTSD.

Gus winds up dead of an apparent suicide after sending an apologetic email to his estranged wife. Alex and Brady suspect foul play and soon Brady finds himself involved with potetnail terrorist actions. More and I would spoil things.

It would appear this is Tapply’s attempt to reconcile the anti-war movements of the sixties with nascent anti-war feelings (not activities since there does not seem to be any formal movement against the Iraq/Afghanistan wars at all) of today. At one point Gus rails against the symbiotic relationship between the military and journalists, each needing the other. Embedded journalists," he said. "They take the pictures they're supposed to take. They don't get to see the caskets, the body bags, the blood and brains splattered against the sides of buildings, the dead American kids half hanging out of blown-up Hummers, the mutilated Iraqi children...The brass. They couldn't control us. Couldn't censor us, couldn't tell us where to go, what to shoot. They knew we were after the stories they didn't want told. The senselessness of it. The failure of it. The friendly fire fatalities. The crappy equipment. The wrongheaded decisions. The dead children. They were all about covering up.”

A few reviewers have complained at the lack of action. Not me. I really like the characters Tapply develops and the two plots in this book are more than satisfactory. He’s a favorite. ( )
  ecw0647 | Sep 30, 2013 |
This review was written for LibraryThing Early Reviewers.
I was really curious about this book after reading the description of it. I do like a good legal thriller and was interested in giving the Brady Coyne series a try. I was engrossed from the very first page and found it both suspenseful and entertaining. Although this book stands well on its own, I do wish I had started with the first in the series. ( )
  LiteraryFeline | Apr 2, 2011 |
This review was written for LibraryThing Early Reviewers.
The Brady Coyne series is one of the best there is and "Hell Bent" is a fine example of the books in the series. A photojournalist who lost a hand in Iraq is Brady's latest client in a divorce case. The new client is also the brother of one of Brady's love interests from earlier in the series, Alex Shaw. When the journalist dies in an apparent suicide and Alex does not believe that it was suicide, Brady investigates and uncovers a terrorist plot along the way. The story is well paced and the characters, most recurring from previous books in the series, are suffciently developed such that you need not have read the earlier books to know them. ( )
  BrianEWilliams | Jul 15, 2009 |
This review was written for LibraryThing Early Reviewers.
Hell Bet by William G. Tapply is a well written book. The story line was well thought out and developed nicely through out the book. When reading this book you are introduced to one story and then quickly brought into another story line all long not losing the first group of characters introduced.
Once Tapply begins to expand on the main storyline involving Brady Coyne you would think that the previous story would be pushed to the wayside however that is not true. Tapply does a wonderful job of not only bringing a conclusion to the main topic but also a conclusion to the beginning story line.

Hell Bent is a story that will keep you guessing until the end. The story grabs you from the beginning and keeps you interested until the very end.

Hell Bent has a little bit of everything to offer the reader from romance to mystery and suspense. Tapply also does a superb job of describing each character so it is as if you know them and in they end you are pulling for the main character Brady Coyne to come out on top and happy.

I highly recommend this book for others to read. ( )
  bgale11 | Nov 22, 2008 |
This review was written for LibraryThing Early Reviewers.
I like fast-paced mystery novels that grab my attention from the first page and sustain my interest until the end.

I like books that are well written and that entertain without offending me and that use characters to move a story forward without resorting to stereotype.

And I like suspense novels that surprise me without stretching the bounds of credulity to their absolute limit (there is only so much disbelief I am capable of suspending).

On all of these fronts, Hell Bent, by William G. Taply delivers.

"Boston attorney Brady Coyne finds his own past coming back to haunt his professional life when his ex-girlfriend Alex Sinclair wants him to represent her brother. Augustine Sinclair was a notable photo-journalist, happily married with two small children - until he returned from a stint in Iraq, missing a hand and suffering from Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. Now he's lost his career, his peace of mind and his family. Brady is hired to see him through the divorce but before they get very far, the photographer is found dead in his rented apartment, an apparent suicide.

But something isn't right and Brady starts to think the suicide is staged. With very little to go on and everyone around him wanting to close the books on the case, Brady soon finds himself in the midst of one of the most dangerous situations of his entire life, facing people who will do anything to avoid being exposed."

As a mystery novel, Hell Bent was highly entertaining, a real page turner that kept my interest. It's well written, with interesting characters and unexpected plot twists.

As a central character, though, Brady Coyne is just too perfect. He prefers to represent underdogs, is pining faithfully for the long-term girlfriend who left him four months earlier (despite the fact that she won't let him call her and leaves him messages telling him to move on) and has a stated weakness for strong, smart women:

"I liked feisty, independent, competent, autonomous, self-contained women. I liked women who knew what they wanted and went after it. I liked women who thought they were at least as important and capable and valuable as men."

Women all seem to be vulnerable to his charms (every woman in the book is described in considerable physical detail and they almost all seem to be beautiful) and men want to be his friend.

He is also modest, self-deprecating and fairly self-critical.

And he is very loyal and attached to his dog, Henry.

Brady Coyne is just too good to be true.

I like flawed characters. I like protagonists who screw up but are essentially well-meaning and good hearted.

This is especially true for mysteries which have an inherent element of good versus evil. When good is too good, it can get just a touch, well, boring.

But really, that's just a quibble (and this one that is leagues better than the mystery novels with a hard boiled detective and the inevitable blond, bosomy bimbo who is the secretary/victim/murderess).

I liked Hell Bent. And if you like well-written, fast-paced mysteries, with progressive politics and interesting characters, you will too. ( )
  lakingston | Oct 29, 2008 |
Showing 1-5 of 20 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

Book description
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 031235830X, Hardcover)

Boston attorney Brady Coyne finds his own past coming back to haunt his professional life when his ex-girlfriend Alex Shaw, long out of touch, reappears, wanting Brady to represent her brother. Augustine Shaw was a notable photo-journalist, happily married with two small children – until he returned from a stint in Iraq missing a hand and suffering from Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. Now he’s lost his career, his peace of mind and his family.

Brady is hired to seem him through the divorce. The client wasn’t eager to accept Brady’s representation, but before the divorce proceedings are very far along, the photographer is found dead in his rented apartment, an apparent suicide.

But something isn’t right and Brady starts to think the suicide was staged. With very little to go on and with everyone around him wanting to quickly close the books on what appears to be a tragic case, Brady soon finds himself alone, in the midst of one of the most dangerous situations of his entire life, and facing people who do anything  to avoid being exposed.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:24:13 -0400)

Coyne finds his own past coming back to haunt his professional life when his ex-girlfriend reappears, wanting him to represent her brother through his divorce. When the client ends up dead, an apparent suicide, the situation becomes very dangerous for all involved.… (more)

» see all 2 descriptions

Quick Links

Swap Ebooks Audio
2 avail.
3 wanted
1 pay

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.76)
0.5
1
1.5
2 1
2.5
3 7
3.5 2
4 23
4.5 1
5 1

LibraryThing Early Reviewers Alumn

Hell Bent by William G. Tapply was made available through LibraryThing Early Reviewers. Sign up to possibly get pre-publication copies of books.

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

You are using the new servers! | About | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 113,784,159 books! | Top bar: Always visible