HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Lilith's Brood by Octavia E. Butler
Loading...

Lilith's Brood (edition 2007)

by Octavia E. Butler

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
1,419355,323 (4.26)62
Member:sturlington
Title:Lilith's Brood
Authors:Octavia E. Butler
Info:Warner Books (2007), Trade paperback
Collections:Your library
Rating:****
Tags:Xenogenesis trilogy, SF - Black, fave author, post-apocalypse, women and girls, omnibus, read in 2007

Work details

Lilith's Brood by Octavia E. Butler

  1. 10
    Kindred by Octavia E. Butler (jlparent)
    jlparent: Although not hard sci-fi like Lilith's Brood - this is Butler's most popular work and is a great read!
  2. 00
    Binti by Nnedi Okorafor (sturlington)
    sturlington: The aliens in Binti reminded me quite a bit of the aliens in Lilith's Brood.
  3. 06
    The Host by Stephenie Meyer (infiniteletters)
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 62 mentions

English (34)  Dutch (1)  All languages (35)
Showing 1-5 of 34 (next | show all)
I've come to "science fiction"/ speculative fiction late in life, and so am still catching up on the "classics" such as the Lilith's Brood trilogy. I had previously read Butler's "Kindred," which is still my favorite, but the Lilith's Brood books are complex and written with her trademark visual richness, easily transporting you to these future worlds while retaining a grounding in the world (with its issues of race, gender, class, environmental degradation, militarism, violence) from which she speculates. I finished this book with a sense of hope (that we can overcome the tendency to hierarchical organization of our lives that is the central flaw the non-human Oankali are trying to help the surviving humans get past: "...the conflict in their genes--the new intelligence put at the service of ancient hierarchical tendencies."). It is the same sense of hope you get from reading Octavia Butler's "children"--the present day authors of Octavia's Brood. (Brian) ( )
  ShawIslandLibrary | Jul 29, 2016 |
This trilogy, (Dawn, Adulthood Rites, and Imago - collectively known as Lilith's Brood), is a remarkable piece of work. Labeled as science fiction, it really transcends the genre. Set against a future tapestry where humanity has all but destroyed the Earth and itself, these stories are, at their core, an exploration of the human condition. Subtly shifting from a human perspective in the first book to an alien perspective in the third book, we find an examination of the unwilling integration of one species with another. An assimilation of those without power or choice by those who hold an overwhelming technological and physical advantage.

Unlike most stories about alien invasion, this is not a hostile takeover tale. The fact that the assimilation is performed in the spirit of 'trade', and with empathy and love, makes it ultimately that much more horrifying. ( )
  ScoLgo | Jun 15, 2016 |
This series is amazing. I am glad that I stumbled upon this series for my Modern and Contemporary Literature course. The series was first published as a three volumes of Xenogenisis: Dawn, Adulthood Rites, and Imago. This set is out of print and was reprinted in 2000 as Lilith's Brood. Well worth anyone's times and I would highly recommend. It truly grasps the parallels of what the World Wars created in the ideas about modernism and the decline of humanity.

The series takes place in a World War III with nuclear weapons making the Earth uninhabitable, but at the time of our extinction, an alien race finds out planet and has hopes to save us from our destructive ways. The story primarily focuses Lilith, a human, through her journey of life changes with the Oankali. They have no plan on harming the humans, but do wish to separate out anyone who will continue their destructive ways. Most are stored in a "hibernation" until they can learn everything about humanity and the planet.

Lilith becomes the teacher of the humans, providing them knowledge on how to provide and live off the land. They are returning to primitive ways with no weapons in hope that they can learn lessons from their mistakes. The twist in the plot is when the Oankali inform the humans that they will breed with them to help genetically obtain peace within their population.

Both species need each other to survive. The Oankali find new planets and split their population into thirds allowing an unchanging group, one to breed with humans and continue searching the universe, and the last group to stay on Earth and continue their aid there. The humans do not openly accept this idea, especially since it means that they cannot conceive in the "natural" way that they see fit. Over the course of the series, this is a pivotal point in the alliance and peace between species.

There is love, loss, and new adventures, but also a hidden understanding that as humans we have a natural instinct of hierarchy that only continues our destructive impact on our history. It is full of twist and turns, engaging the reader into the book feeling like they are part of the story as well. I would give this overall set a 4 star rating since I did find that I enjoyed the first two books (5 Stars) more than the final (3 Stars). ( )
  Literature_Owl | May 27, 2016 |
An amazing read. I don't know how I've lived this long without reading Octavia Butler ( )
  kristina_brooke | Apr 15, 2016 |
Good story and lots of meaty material for thought. Themes of freedom (and lack of) run throughout, colonialism and personal responsibility. Really good, highly recommended. ( )
  csmith0406 | Mar 18, 2016 |
Showing 1-5 of 34 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
In memory of Mike Hodel who,
through his READ/SF campaign
for literacy, sought to share
with everyone the pleasure and
usefulness of the written word.

(preceding Dawn)
To Lynn--
write!

(preceding Adulthood Rites)
To Irie Isaacs

(preceding Imago)
First words
Alive! (Dawn)
He remembered much of his stay in the womb. (Adulthood Rites)
I slipped into my metamorphosis so quietly that no one noticed. (Imago)
Quotations
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (1)

Book description
Lilith's Brood is a collection of three works by Octavia Butler: Dawn, Adulthood Rites and Imago. The three volumes of this science fiction series were previously collected in the now out of print volume, Xenogenesis.
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0446676101, Paperback)

The acclaimed trilogy that comprises LILITH'S BROOD is multiple Hugo and Nebula award-winner Octavia E. Butler at her best. Presented for the first time in one volume, with an introduction by Joan Slonczewski, Ph.D., LILITH'S BROOD is a profoundly evocative, sensual -- and disturbing -- epic of human transformation.

Lilith Iyapo is in the Andes, mourning the death of her family, when war destroys Earth. Centuries later, she is resurrected -- by miraculously powerful unearthly beings, the Oankali. Driven by an irresistible need to heal others, the Oankali are rescuing our dying planet by merging genetically with mankind. But Lilith and all humanity must now share the world with uncanny, unimaginably alien creatures: their own children. This is their story...

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:09:05 -0400)

(see all 4 descriptions)

All of humanity must share the world with uncanny, unimaginable alien creatures after war destroys Earth, in an omnibus edition containing three class science fiction novels--Dawn, Adulthood Rites, and Imago. The acclaimed trilogy that comprises Lilith's Brood is multiple Hugo and Nebula award-winner Octavia E. Butler at her best. Presented for the first time in one volume, with an introduction by Joan Slonczewski, Ph.D., Lilith's Brood is a profoundly evocative, sensual--and disturbing--epic of human transformation. Lilith Lyapo is in the Andes, mourning the death of her family, when war destroys Earth. Centuries later, she is resurrected, by miraculously powerful unearthly beings, the Oankali. Driven by an irresistible need to heal others, the Oankali are rescuing our dying planet by merging genetically with mankind. But Lilith and all humanity must now share the world with uncanny, unimaginably alien creatures: Their own children. This is their story.… (more)

(summary from another edition)

» see all 2 descriptions

Quick Links

Swap Ebooks Audio
197 wanted3 pay

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (4.26)
0.5
1 3
1.5 1
2 7
2.5 3
3 29
3.5 8
4 116
4.5 13
5 141

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

You are using the new servers! | About | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 108,438,897 books! | Top bar: Always visible