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Human Nature and the Limits of Science by…
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Human Nature and the Limits of Science (edition 2003)

by John Dupre

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Member:agbram
Title:Human Nature and the Limits of Science
Authors:John Dupre
Info:Oxford University Press, USA (2003), Paperback, 216 pages
Collections:Your library
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Tags:Science, Textbook, Nonfiction

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Human Nature and the Limits of Science by John Dupre

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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 019926550X, Paperback)

John Dupré warns that our understanding of human nature is being distorted by two faulty and harmful forms of pseudo-scientific thinking. Not just in the academic world but increasingly in everyday life, we find one set of experts seeking to explain the ends at which humans aim in terms of evolutionary theory, and another set of experts using economic models to give rules of how we act to achieve those ends. Dupré demonstrates that these theorists' explanations do not work, and furthermore that if taken seriously their theories tend to have dangerous social and political consequences. For these reasons, it is important to resist scientism--an exaggerated conception of what science can be expected to do for us.
Dupré restores sanity to the study of human nature by pointing the way to a proper understanding of humans in the societies that are our natural and necessary environments. Anyone interested in science and human nature will enjoy this book, unless they are its targets.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:20:48 -0400)

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