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Hot, Flat, and Crowded: Why We Need a Green…
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Hot, Flat, and Crowded: Why We Need a Green Revolution--and How It Can… (2008)

by Thomas L. Friedman

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2,161None3,003 (3.75)91
  1. 10
    The World is Flat: A Brief History of the Twenty-First Century by Thomas L. Friedman (skyiscool)
    skyiscool: Hot, Flat, and Crowded builds off many of the topics that Friedman presents in The World Is Flat. Although both books adequately stand on their own, they together form an informed and powerful worldview.
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Showing 1-5 of 48 (next | show all)
I have found this book to contain a lot of great information (facts, projections and opinion), but much of it seems like repetition. I have listened thru the third CD and he seems to keep preaching why the world needs to change even though that was established early on. I hope there is content further on that offers some new information or solutions.
  bbeyeler | Nov 17, 2013 |
It took me a long time to read this book. A damn long time. But it was worth slogging through. Friedman outlines why we are in trouble which to many, including myself seems quite obvious. However, Friedman does an excellent job outlining how the problem can be fixed and money can be made by doing so. Making money is the only thing that matters in corporate America and it is/should be the prime motivator for the changes we need.

Unlike many other environmental books HF&C doesn't preach that you, an individual is going to be able to save the world through living the "green" life. Though doing so will help. Friedman focuses his energy on large scale changes that can make large scale changes and tells us that it isn't going to be an easy thing to do. There is still hope, but only if we act swiftly and forcefully.

( )
  dtn620 | Sep 22, 2013 |
3.5 stars

The author of this book is looking ahead to a world that is hot (global warming), flat (more and more people are becoming middle class), and crowded (overpopulated). He also shares ways to help turn around the course we are on for our planet.

I have to admit that I was not as excited about politics and economics in the book, as they are not topics that I'm usually interested in; however, they do play a significant role in “fixing” what we're doing. The author provides good explanations and examples and I found it easy to understand. The book is a bit dry at times, but never really boring (for me), as it is a topic I'm particularly interested in. I do quite a bit, personally, but I do feel like it will never be enough unless the political will is there to make much much bigger changes. This book focuses on the U.S. It would be interesting for me, as a Canadian, to read more about Canada's role, but since we are so close the U.S., I'm sure it would be a book very much the same. I think it's worth a read for those interested in the environment. ( )
  LibraryCin | Sep 15, 2013 |
Thomas Friedman does a good job of synthesizing the elements of contemporary society into trends and themes and he makes a convincing case for the direction he would like to see the United States move towards. While this book is very readable overall, at times (particularly towards the beginning of the book) Friedman's frequent and repetitive analogies and metaphors, combined with multiple short stories explaining the same point, sort of made it feel like Friedman was hitting a hammer on his readers' heads to get the point across. And since most people likely wouldn't even pick up and read this book if they didn't already somewhat agree with the opinions expressed in this book, that kind of writing just insults the reader. ( )
  wagner.sarah35 | Aug 24, 2013 |
I am so glad this is done. Friedman has a lot of good things to say, but apparently his motto is why say something in 1,000 words if 10,000 will do. He beats every point plum to death. By the end, one is almost rooting for the greedy robber barons... ( )
  ScoutJ | Aug 7, 2013 |
Showing 1-5 of 48 (next | show all)
Where does a man who needs his own offshore drilling platform just to keep the east wing of his house heated get the balls to write a book chiding America for driving energy inefficient automobiles?

added by lorax | editNew York Press, Matt Taibbi (Jan 14, 2009)
 
Why do we race to use up the earth’s non-renewable resources? How can we prevent the destruction of our ecosystem? Those are key questions posed in Tom Friedman’s follow-up to The World is Flat, entitled Hot, Flat, and Crowded
 
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In June 2004, I was visiting London with my daughter Orly, and one evening we went to see the play Billy Elliot at a theater near Victoria Station.
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Friedman takes a fresh and provocative look at two of the biggest challenges we face today: the global environmental crisis and America's surprising loss of focus and national purpose since 9/11. Friedman explains how global warming, rapidly growing populations, and the astonishing expansion of the world's middle class through globalization have produced a planet that is 'hot, flat, and crowded'. In just a few years, it will be too late to fix things - unless there is a worldwide effort to replace our wasteful, inefficient energy practices with a strategy for clean energy, energy efficiency, and conservation that Friedman calls Code Green.
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Amazon.com Amazon.com Review (ISBN 0374166854, Hardcover)

Book Description

Thomas L. Friedman’s phenomenal number-one bestseller The World Is Flat has helped millions of readers to see the world in a new way. In his brilliant, essential new book, Friedman takes a fresh and provocative look at two of the biggest challenges we face today: America’s surprising loss of focus and national purpose since 9/11; and the global environmental crisis, which is affecting everything from food to fuel to forests. In this groundbreaking account of where we stand now, he shows us how the solutions to these two big problems are linked--how we can restore the world and revive America at the same time.

Friedman explains how global warming, rapidly growing populations, and the astonishing expansion of the world’s middle class through globalization have produced a planet that is “hot, flat, and crowded.” Already the earth is being affected in ways that threaten to make it dangerously unstable. In just a few years, it will be too late to fix things--unless the United States steps up now and takes the lead in a worldwide effort to replace our wasteful, inefficient energy practices with a strategy for clean energy, energy efficiency, and conservation that Friedman calls Code Green.

This is a great challenge, Friedman explains, but also a great opportunity, and one that America cannot afford to miss. Not only is American leadership the key to the healing of the earth; it is also our best strategy for the renewal of America.

In vivid, entertaining chapters, Friedman makes it clear that the green revolution we need is like no revolution the world has seen. It will be the biggest innovation project in American history; it will be hard, not easy; and it will change everything from what you put into your car to what you see on your electric bill. But the payoff for America will be more than just cleaner air. It will inspire Americans to something we haven’t seen in a long time--nation-building in America--by summoning the intelligence, creativity, boldness, and concern for the common good that are our nation’s greatest natural resources.

Hot, Flat, and Crowded is classic Thomas L. Friedman: fearless, incisive, forward-looking, and rich in surprising common sense about the challenge--and the promise--of the future.

Thomas Friedman and Fareed Zakaria: Author One-to-One

Fareed Zakaria: Your book is about two things, the climate crisis and also about an American crisis. Why do you link the two?  Fareed Zakaria

Thomas Friedman: You're absolutely right--it is about two things. The book says, America has a problem and the world has a problem. The world's problem is that it's getting hot, flat and crowded and that convergence--that perfect storm--is driving a lot of negative trends. America's problem is that we've lost our way--we've lost our groove as a country. And the basic argument of the book is that we can solve our problem by taking the lead in solving the world's problem.

Zakaria: Explain what you mean by "hot, flat and crowded."

Friedman: There is a convergence of basically three large forces: one is global warming, which has been going on at a very slow pace since the industrial revolution; the second--what I call the flattening of the world--is a metaphor for the rise of middle-class citizens, from China to India to Brazil to Russia to Eastern Europe, who are beginning to consume like Americans. That's a blessing in so many ways--it's a blessing for global stability and for global growth. But it has enormous resource complications, if all these people--whom you've written about in your book, The Post American World--begin to consume like Americans. And lastly, global population growth simply refers to the steady growth of population in general, but at the same time the growth of more and more people able to live this middle-class lifestyle. Between now and 2020, the world's going to add another billion people. And their resource demands--at every level--are going to be enormous. I tell the story in the book how, if we give each one of the next billion people on the planet just one sixty-watt incandescent light bulb, what it will mean: the answer is that it will require about 20 new 500-megawatt coal-burning power plants. That's so they can each turn on just one light bulb!

Zakaria: In my book I talk about the "rise of the rest" and about the reality of how this rise of new powerful economic nations is completely changing the way the world works. Most everyone's efforts have been devoted to Kyoto-like solutions, with the idea of getting western countries to reduce their carbon dioxide emissions. But I grew to realize that the West was a sideshow. India and China will build hundreds of coal-fire power plants in the next ten years and the combined carbon dioxide emissions of those new plants alone are five times larger than the savings mandated by the Kyoto accords. What do you do with the Indias and Chinas of the world?

Thomas FriedmanFriedman: I think there are two approaches. There has to be more understanding of the basic unfairness they feel. They feel like we sat down, had the hors d'oeuvres, ate the entrée, pretty much finished off the dessert, invited them for tea and coffee and then said, "Let's split the bill." So I understand the big sense of unfairness--they feel that now that they have a chance to grow and reach with large numbers a whole new standard of living, we're basically telling them, "Your growth, and all the emissions it would add, is threatening the world's climate." At the same time, what I say to them--what I said to young Chinese most recently when I was just in China is this: Every time I come to China, young Chinese say to me, "Mr. Friedman, your country grew dirty for 150 years. Now it's our turn." And I say to them, "Yes, you're absolutely right, it's your turn. Grow as dirty as you want. Take your time. Because I think we probably just need about five years to invent all the new clean power technologies you're going to need as you choke to death, and we're going to come and sell them to you. And we're going to clean your clock in the next great global industry. So please, take your time. If you want to give us a five-year lead in the next great global industry, I will take five. If you want to give us ten, that would be even better. In other words, I know this is unfair, but I am here to tell you that in a world that's hot, flat and crowded, ET--energy technology--is going to be as big an industry as IT--information technology. Maybe even bigger. And who claims that industry--whose country and whose companies dominate that industry--I think is going to enjoy more national security, more economic security, more economic growth, a healthier population, and greater global respect, for that matter, as well. So you can sit back and say, it's not fair that we have to compete in this new industry, that we should get to grow dirty for a while, or you can do what you did in telecommunications, and that is try to leap-frog us. And that's really what I'm saying to them: this is a great economic opportunity. The game is still open. I want my country to win it--I'm not sure it will.

Zakaria: I'm struck by the point you make about energy technology. In my book I'm pretty optimistic about the United States. But the one area where I'm worried is actually ET. We do fantastically in biotech, we're doing fantastically in nanotechnology. But none of these new technologies have the kind of system-wide effect that information technology did. Energy does. If you want to find the next technological revolution you need to find an industry that transforms everything you do. Biotechnology affects one critical aspect of your day-to-day life, health, but not all of it. But energy--the consumption of energy--affects every human activity in the modern world. Now, my fear is that, of all the industries in the future, that's the one where we're not ahead of the pack. Are we going to run second in this race?

Friedman: Well, I want to ask you that, Fareed. Why do you think we haven't led this industry, which itself has huge technological implications? We have all the secret sauce, all the technological prowess, to lead this industry. Why do you think this is the one area--and it's enormous, it's actually going to dwarf all the others--where we haven't been at the real cutting edge?

Continue reading the Q&A between Thomas Friedman and Fareed Zakaria

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:46:45 -0400)

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Friedman's bestseller "The World Is Flat" has helped millions of readers to see globalization in a new way. Now the author brings a fresh outlook to the crises of destabilizing climate change and rising competition for energy.

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