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Whatever Became of Sin? by Karl Menninger
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Whatever Became of Sin?

by Karl Menninger

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CHAPTER NOTES; INDEX
  saintmarysaccden | Oct 25, 2013 |
Hardback
  pastorroy | Jan 15, 2013 |
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 055327368X, Mass Market Paperback)

"WHATEVER BECAME OF SIN?" BY KARL MENNINGER, M.D. For many years the name Karl Menninger has been almost synonymous in America with the science and the practice of psychiatry. His book THE HUMAN MIND introduced that branch of medicine to the american public in 1930. In the present book Dr. Menninger attempts to apply psychiatry to a world-wide affliction, the depression, gloom, discouragement and apprehensiveess which are so prevalent. The word "sin" has almost disappeared from our vocabulary, but the sense of guilt remains in our hearts and minds. The prisoners punished in our jails are a small minority of all the offenders; "all we like sheep have gone astray." While a few deplore their guilt, many remain blandly indifferent or vaguely depressed or bitterly accusatory of others. Are these states of illness? Not until the EPILOGUE, which he calls a deferred preface, does the author tell us how he came to write this book and how he has come from from many yearsof experience to consider moral values an essential aspect of psychiatry. If, as he believes, mental health and moral health are identical, the recognition of the reality of sin offers to the suffering struggling, anxious world a real hope not of belated treatment but of prevention. This task enlists the physcian, the psychiatrist, the minister, the lawyer, the editor, the teacher, and the mother in a common army- an army against self-destruction and world destruction. About the author: DR. KARL MENNINGER , along with his father and brother- later his son and nephews- developed a psychiatric center in Topeka, Kansas, known now all over the world. He has written a dozen books and belongs to a score of national psychiatric organizations, several of which he founded.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:18:29 -0400)

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