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The Good the Spam and the Ugly by Steve…
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The Good the Spam and the Ugly

by Steve Graham

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The Good, The Spam and The Ugly is about a man who began responding to spam e-mails, attempting to see what ridiculous lies he could cause spammers to believe. His goal was to see how long they would continue responding as he gave sillier excuses for being unable to send them money yet. It was surprising what he got away with, although as he suggests, this may reflect the spammers’ ignorance of American culture.

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  DoingDewey | Jun 29, 2014 |
The Good, The Spam and The Ugly is about a man who began responding to spam e-mails, attempting to see what ridiculous lies he could cause spammers to believe. His goal was to see how long they would continue responding as he gave sillier excuses for being unable to send them money yet. It was surprising what he got away with, although as he suggests, this may reflect the spammers’ ignorance of American culture.

The book started off really well, with a humorous introduction by the author and I had high hopes for the rest of the book. However, while funny, the book failed to live up to my expectations. There were definitely some funny parts and some of the exchanges where the author causes spammers to e-mail each other were the funniest conversations. However, there were a lot of e-mails from spammers all following the same general formula and the author’s e-mails were mostly of the sort which would be funny to 13-year-old boys. In part because of the skimmable scammer e-mails, this was a very quick read, 3 hours tops.

The author’s writing and his explanations of the e-mails were by far funnier than the e-mails themselves and it was simply unfortunate there wasn’t more commentary. Although the book wasn’t as funny as I hoped, I wouldn’t hesitate to read another book by the author if the format involved more of the author’s own writing. ( )
  DoingDewey | Nov 6, 2012 |
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0806528249, Paperback)

Date: Fri, 11 Mar 2005 18:38:09 +0000 (GMT) Subject: CONFIDENTIAL . . . To: honbarrsedd4za@yahoo.co.in PROPOSAL FOR URGENT ASSISTANCE Dear Sir: I must solicit your confidence in this transaction. I am a high placed official with the Department of Finance Affairs in Lagos, Nigeria. I and two other colleagues are in need of a silent foreign partner whose bank account we can use to transfer the sum of $18,000,000. This are monies left by a barrister who died tragically in a plane crash last year . . . Sound familiar? Congratulations. You have been selected to become a mugu, an expression African con artists use to describe the targets of their e-mail scams. But they drew a bead on the wrong guy when they started spamming Steve H. Graham. Like many Internet users, Graham eventually got tired of receiving mugu mail and decided to fire back at his wannabe swindlers. Armed with a scathing sense of humor, Graham quickly turned the tables on his tormenters-with side-splittingly hilarious results. Whether he's referring to his fictional lawyer Biff Wellington, complaining about the injury he received while milking a lactating sloth, or offering the Preparation H helpline as his phone number, Graham-using aliases such as Wile E. Coyote, Barney Rubble, and Herman Munster-offers proof that spamming the spammers is the best revenge. Steve H. Graham is a retired attorney. Since childhood, he has been fighting for truth, justice, and free movie passes. For each copy sold of this book, he will donate 100 percent of the proceeds to himself. He is also the author of the cookbook Eat What You Want and Die Like a Man. He lives in Miami.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:05:22 -0400)

Presents the often-humorous e-mail correspondence between the author and spammers.

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