HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

The Geopolitics of Emotion: How Cultures of…
Loading...

The Geopolitics of Emotion: How Cultures of Fear, Humiliation, and Hope…

by Dominique Moisi

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations
964125,712 (3.63)None

None.

None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

English (3)  Dutch (1)  All (4)
Showing 3 of 3
Very interesting read with the focus and spotlight on two countries where hope is very much alive and kicking, China and India (Chindia).

While both countries are experiencing blistering growth rates the manner in which they are achieving it merits some close examination. China is trying to marry stern authoritarianism with bleeding edge capitalism sort of a North Korea meets the United States kind of approach. Will that work in the long run? A country bereft of democratic traditions and an independent judicial system. It has managed to create a super rich class, a sizeable middle class (around 350 million) but about a billion of it's citizen are yet to experience the fruits of this windfall and will they keep quiet for long or is it a calm before the storm.

Some of it's actions have not endeared it to the International community at large, for instance, it has territorial disputes with every country it shares borders with, it's reaction towards any attempt to appease the Dalai Lama is always visceral and at times childish. It continues to militarily support megalomaniacs and failed states the likes of North Korea, Zimbabwe and Pakistan. It's continued support for the evil Sudanese junta is unconscionable.

India on the other hand has it's own share of problems some of which it shares with China, such as it's large underclass population that could prove to be the straw that broke the camel's back. It's venal and corrupt politicians. So for every two steps forward the country takes a step back.
  danoomistmatiste | Jan 24, 2016 |
Very interesting read with the focus and spotlight on two countries where hope is very much alive and kicking, China and India (Chindia).

While both countries are experiencing blistering growth rates the manner in which they are achieving it merits some close examination. China is trying to marry stern authoritarianism with bleeding edge capitalism sort of a North Korea meets the United States kind of approach. Will that work in the long run? A country bereft of democratic traditions and an independent judicial system. It has managed to create a super rich class, a sizeable middle class (around 350 million) but about a billion of it's citizen are yet to experience the fruits of this windfall and will they keep quiet for long or is it a calm before the storm.

Some of it's actions have not endeared it to the International community at large, for instance, it has territorial disputes with every country it shares borders with, it's reaction towards any attempt to appease the Dalai Lama is always visceral and at times childish. It continues to militarily support megalomaniacs and failed states the likes of North Korea, Zimbabwe and Pakistan. It's continued support for the evil Sudanese junta is unconscionable.

India on the other hand has it's own share of problems some of which it shares with China, such as it's large underclass population that could prove to be the straw that broke the camel's back. It's venal and corrupt politicians. So for every two steps forward the country takes a step back.
  kkhambadkone | Jan 17, 2016 |
"Fear against hope, hope against humiliation, leading to sheer irrationality and even sometimes, to violence - one cannot comprehend the world in which we live without examining the emotions that help to sharpe it. We cannot understand this world withou trying to integrate and understand emotions. p xi This context is important to appreciate in learning to work with people around the world.
  goneal | Sep 19, 2009 |
Showing 3 of 3
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (1)

Book description
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0307387372, Paperback)

In the first book to investigate the far-reaching emotional impact of globalization, Dominique Moïsi shows how the geopolitics of today is characterized by a “clash of emotions.” The West, he argues, is dominated and divided by fear. For Muslims and Arabs, a culture of humiliation is quickly devolving into a culture of hatred. Asia, on the other hand, has been able to concentrate on building a better future, so it is creating a new culture of hope. Moïsi, a leading authority on international affairs, explains that in order to understand our changing world, we need to confront emotion. And as he makes his case, he deciphers the driving emotions behind our cultural differences, delineating a provocative and important new perspective on globalization.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:20:08 -0400)

(see all 3 descriptions)

The first book to investigate the far-reaching emotional impact of globalization. Dominique Moi:si, an authority on international affairs, argues that our post-9/11 world has become divided by more than cultural fault lines. He chronicles how the geopolitics of today is characterized by a "clash of emotions," and how cultures of fear, humiliation, and hope are reshaping the world. Moi:si contends that the United States and Europe have been dominated by fears of the "other" and of their loss of a national identity and purpose. For Muslims, the combination of historical grievances, exclusion from the economic boon of globalization, and civil and religious conflicts have created a culture of humiliation that is quickly devolving into a culture of hatred. Meanwhile, Asia has been able to concentrate on building a better future and seizing the economic initiative from the American-dominated West, creating a new culture of hope. How will these varying emotions influence the political, social, and cultural conflicts that roil our world? And what will the effect of the world economic crisis be?--From publisher description.… (more)

Quick Links

Swap Ebooks Audio
8 wanted1 pay

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.63)
0.5
1
1.5
2 1
2.5 1
3 2
3.5 2
4 4
4.5
5 2

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 119,402,871 books! | Top bar: Always visible