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The Future of Class in History: What's Left…
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The Future of Class in History: What's Left of the Social?

by Geoff Eley

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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0472069640, Paperback)

Unifying concepts are essential when studying history. They provide students and scholars with ways to organize their thoughts, research, and writings. However, these concepts are also the focus of myriad conflicts within the field. Social history has experienced more than its share of such conflicts since its inception some forty years ago. In recent times the fields of “the social” and of “culture” have sometimes been presented as mutually exclusive and even hostile. Once again, conceptual innovation in history has been cast as a closure by which the new drives out the old: in this case, cultural history radically displacing social history. The Future of Class in History analyzes the effect of the conflict that followed the “turn to culture” in historical work by examining the use of class and demonstrates how practitioners in multiple fields can collaborate to produce the highest quality scholarship.

 

“Offers new ways of thinking about ‘class’ and ‘society’ in a world in which such categories have been radically called into question.”

—Sherry Ortner, University of California, Los Angeles

 

“Brilliantly charts social history’s past achievement, present dilemma, and future promise in a work distinguished by intellectual openness and generosity.”

—James A. Epstein, Vanderbilt University

 

“Eley and Nield seek to rescue the deluded follower of social history from the enormous condescension of the cultural turn. They succeed admirably, making the case for a new hybrid socio-cultural history.”
—Donald Reid, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

 

“This terrific double act has once again produced a text that demands to be read by all those tired of the juxtaposition of social and cultural histories and still interested in the problematic of class and the politics of its past and present.”

—James Vernon, University of California, Berkeley

 

“Eley and Nield tackle a contentious debate with a gracious plea for collaboration. Their strong desire to get past the ‘culture wars’ and to engage social and cultural historians in fruitful dialogue is a welcome move, stylishly executed.”
—Philippa Levine, University of Southern California

 

Geoff Eley is Professor of History at the University of Michigan.

Keith Nield is Professor Emeritus of History at the University of Hull.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:07:48 -0400)

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