HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Gerald W. Johnson: From Southern Liberal to…
Loading...

Gerald W. Johnson: From Southern Liberal to National Conscience

by Vincent Fitzpatrick

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations
4None1,664,912NoneNone

None.

None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

No reviews
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

Book description
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0807127507, Hardcover)

Born in Riverton, North Carolina, Gerald White Johnson (1890-1980) served as one of the most eloquent spokespersons for America's adversary culture in the twentieth century. His prolific career spanned nearly seventy-five years and produced approximately fifteen million words. Among his more than forty books were biographies, histories, novels and two highly successful children's series on American history and government. A friend of H. L. Mencken, Johnson always considered himself primarily a journalist. His prose brought acclaim to such newspapers as the Greensboro Daily News and the Baltimore Evening Sun. He was a regional writer who enjoyed dissecting the South for his fellow southerners and explaining it to Yankees, and a national writer who did not hesitate to voice his opinion on everything from the 1929 stock market crash to Vietnam.

In the first biography of Johnson, Vincent Fitzpatrick draws upon a wealth of archival material to chronicle the writer's service in the American Expeditionary Force during World War I, his experience as the first professor of journalism at the University of North Carolina, and his years in Baltimore with the Evening Sun. Fitzpatrick analyzes Johnson's commentary on the Scopes trial, denunciation of the Ku Klux Klan, defense of President Franklin Roosevelt's New Deal, criticism of Senator Joseph McCarthy, and battles with the Republican Party during President Eisenhower's two terms. He was, to borrow his own phrase, a "disturber of the peace." Fitzpatrick brings this controversial essayist, journalist, editor, historian, biographer, and novelist vividly to life in all his diverse roles. The long and lively career of Gerald Johnson, whom Adlai Stevenson extolled as "the critic and conscience of our time," proves a significant part of the American record in the twentieth century.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:23:29 -0400)

No library descriptions found.

Quick Links

Swap Ebooks Audio
1 wanted

Popular covers

Rating

Average: No ratings.

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 120,654,732 books! | Top bar: Always visible