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Verdi by Janell Cannon
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Verdi (1997)

by Janell Cannon

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1,518624,865 (4.19)14

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This book can help students realize things change and it doesnt mean its bad. That they can be themselves and that we are all diferent. Young Verdi doesn’t want to grow up big and green. He likes his bright yellow skin and sporty stripes. Besides, all the green snakes he meets are lazy, boring, and rude. When Verdi finds a pale green stripe stretching along his whole body, he tries every trick he can think of to get rid of it--and ends up in a heap of trouble. Despite his efforts, Verdi turns green, but to his delight, he discovers that being green doesn’t mean he has to stop being himself. Age Range: 4 - 7 years
Grade Level: Preschool - 3
  RosaJuarez | Apr 5, 2017 |
I really liked this book for many reasons. First the main character of Verdi is well developed. For example, the book starts out with him being a young yellow snake who is very energetic. He never wants to be like the old and lazy green snakes. But as he gets older he realizes he needs to take life a little slower, but he can still be himself. I think that this book pushes readers to think about how being themselves is ore important than blending in. For example, even though Verdi ended up looking like all the other snakes he still wanted to be himself so that he could be happy. The big idea of this story is to be yourself because it is important to express your individuality. ( )
  Erica_Dickey | Oct 3, 2016 |
Young Verdi doesn’t want to grow up big and green. He likes his bright yellow skin and sporty stripes. Besides, all the green snakes he meets are lazy, boring, and rude. When Verdi finds a pale green stripe stretching along his whole body, he tries every trick he can think of to get rid of it--and ends up in a heap of trouble. Despite his efforts, Verdi turns green, but to his delight, he discovers that being green doesn’t mean he has to stop being himself.
2 books
  TUCC | Sep 16, 2016 |
GR: O
GL: 4.8
DRA: 34
Lexile: AD620L
  Infinityand1 | Aug 3, 2016 |
I would use this book in my classroom because I think the stories that Janell Cannon writes are filled with lots of great morals and character qualities. I think this is a great story to tie in with my text set because it can be used not only for a species related topic, but also for ELA. I would definitely use this book for a reader’s theatre. ( )
  rachelpelston | Apr 29, 2016 |
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On a small tropical island, the sun rose high above the steamy jungle.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Amazon.com Amazon.com Review (ISBN 0152010289, Hardcover)

Verdi is a proud python, flourishing in the flower of his youth. He loves to swiftly slither around the forest, brandishing his bright yellow skin, and can't fathom why anyone would want to be sleepy and green like the adult snakes he knows. Verdi insists, as so many youngsters do, "I will never be lazy, boring or green!" Despite his resolve to stay young, one day he notices a patch of green spreading down the length of his body. Verdi does everything he can think of to erase this first sign of the inevitable tide of age. But in his frenzy of youthful, Icarus-like bravado, he nearly kills himself. Finally, Verdi learns that even though he can't stop the aging process, green skin won't keep him from being a fun-loving, young-at-heart, figure-eight-forming snake.

Janell Cannon's illustrations are exquisite. As in her award-winning Stellaluna, not only are the animal drawings painstakingly accurate, they are also awash with movement and beauty. The countless shades of greeny-yellow and yellowy-green have the effect of a cool eye compress for the reader--calming, inviting, and enticing readers to reach into the lush environment of the pages. Verdi's lesson is never didactic, always compelling, and pleasantly surprising. (Ages 4 and older)

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:02:45 -0400)

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A young python does not want to grow slow and boring like the older snakes he sees in the tropical jungle where he lives.

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