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Intelligence Activities in Ancient Rome:…
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Intelligence Activities in Ancient Rome: Trust in the Gods, but Verify (2005)

by Rose Mary Sheldon

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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Rose Mary Sheldonprimary authorall editionscalculated
Knox, Bernard M. W.Forewordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0415452716, Paperback)

Professor Sheldon uses the modern concept of the intelligence cycle to trace intelligence activities in Rome whether they were done by private citizens, the government, or the military.

Examining a broad range of activities the book looks at the many  types of espionage tradecraft that have left their traces in the ancient sources:

* intelligence and counterintelligence gathering
* covert action
* clandestine operations
* the use of codes and ciphers

Dispelling the myth that such activities are a modern invention, Professor Sheldon explores how these ancient spy stories have modern echoes as well. What is the role of an intelligence service in a free republic? When do the security needs of the state outweigh the rights of the citizen? If we cannot trust our own security services, how safe can we be? Although protected by the Praetorian Guard, seventy-five percent of Roman emperors died by assassination or under attack by pretenders to his throne. Who was guarding the guardians?

For students of Rome, and modern social studies too - this will provide a fascinating read.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:10:35 -0400)

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