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The Tortoise and the Hare: An Aesop's…
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The Tortoise and the Hare: An Aesop's Fable

by Angela McAllister

Other authors: See the other authors section.

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I enjoyed this story. It is a highly renounced and well known piece of traditional literature. I liked that the story had a solid and interesting plot, and also that the illustrations were simple but also had detail and appeared older. It is neat that the illustrator made the illustrations look older since this story is a form of traditional literature, the oldest stories with unidentifiable authors. First, I enjoyed the solid and interesting plot of the story. For example, it all started with a race that was to happen between the Tortoise and the Hare. The Tortoise is the one who wanted the race. Clearly everyone would think the Hare was going to win. The Tortoise knew he was the underdog and he was determined, unlike Hare. What helped set the plot was at this moment where Tortoise squinted up at Hare and said, "Think you can beat me, eh?" Of course everyone thought Hare would win because rabbits are faster than turtles. Another example that factors into the interesting plot is, "When Tortoise reached the mill, there were carrot tops lying scattered on the ground. Tortoise smiled and carried on his way, slow but sure." This is where Tortoise was really determined to finish the race because he knew that Hare had gotten distracted. Tortoise did not take one break along the entire race. He kept fighting until the finish line. The other thing that I liked about the story was that there were simple illustrations that included detail to make them appear older. For example, a picture of Tortoise reaching the bridge to win the race; the animals look older because of the color of the illustrations. The illustrator tended to use some darker and more plain colors. It appears that we could be back in the days of Noah's Arc by the way the animals appear in the illustrations. Also, there was a picture of Tortoise along the lane. He seemed to still be trotting along. The setting is clearly shown in the background, where the mill was and the lane was shown in which he was walking along.

The big idea/main message of the story is that slow and steady wins the race. Taking your time when doing things makes you more successful. Hare just acted quick and did not care about the race. Tortoise took his time and was determined to finish the race. He went slow and steady, and he won their race. ( )
  kgibso11 | Mar 21, 2016 |
I enjoyed this story. It is a highly renounced and well known piece of traditional literature. I liked that the story had a solid and interesting plot, and also that the illustrations were simple but also had detail and appeared older. It is neat that the illustrator made the illustrations look older since this story is a form of traditional literature, the oldest stories with unidentifiable authors. First, I enjoyed the solid and interesting plot of the story. For example, it all started with a race that was to happen between the Tortoise and the Hare. The Tortoise is the one who wanted the race. Clearly everyone would think the Hare was going to win. The Tortoise knew he was the underdog and he was determined, unlike Hare. What helped set the plot was at this moment where Tortoise squinted up at Hare and said, "Think you can beat me, eh?" Of course everyone thought Hare would win because rabbits are faster than turtles. Another example that factors into the interesting plot is, "When Tortoise reached the mill, there were carrot tops lying scattered on the ground. Tortoise smiled and carried on his way, slow but sure." This is where Tortoise was really determined to finish the race because he knew that Hare had gotten distracted. Tortoise did not take one break along the entire race. He kept fighting until the finish line. The other thing that I liked about the story was that there were simple illustrations that included detail to make them appear older. For example, a picture of Tortoise reaching the bridge to win the race; the animals look older because of the color of the illustrations. The illustrator tended to use some darker and more plain colors. It appears that we could be back in the days of Noah's Arc by the way the animals appear in the illustrations. Also, there was a picture of Tortoise along the lane. He seemed to still be trotting along. The setting is clearly shown in the background, where the mill was and the lane was shown in which he was walking along.

The big idea/main message of the story is that slow and steady wins the race. Taking your time when doing things makes you more successful. Hare just acted quick and did not care about the race. Tortoise took his time and was determined to finish the race. He went slow and steady, and he won their race. ( )
  abecke14 | Oct 27, 2015 |
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Angela McAllisterprimary authorall editionscalculated
Heale, JonathanIllustratormain authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Recounts the traditional tale of the race between the persevering tortoise and the boastful hare.Un día, Tortuga oyó que Liebre se jactaba delante de unos conejos: 'Puedo correr tan rápido que dejo atrás al viento.' '¡Qué tontería!' dijo Tortuga. 'Te echo una carrera....'… (more)

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