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The Virgin Suicides by Jeffrey Eugenides
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The Virgin Suicides (original 1993; edition 1994)

by Jeffrey Eugenides

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations / Mentions
9,641193299 (3.8)1 / 318
Member:chevrefeuille
Title:The Virgin Suicides
Authors:Jeffrey Eugenides
Info:Grand Central Publishing (1994), Paperback, 256 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:*****
Tags:death, suicide, american, mi, 1970's, fiction, pb, mooched, outstanding

Work details

The Virgin Suicides by Jeffrey Eugenides (1993)

  1. 82
    Middlesex by Jeffrey Eugenides (bookmomo)
    bookmomo: share the same exquisite sense of setting: boring, but not terrible suburban America, second half of last century.
  2. 50
    The Bell Jar by Sylvia Plath (readerbabe1984, rosylibrarian)
  3. 20
    White Oleander by Janet Fitch (rosylibrarian)
  4. 10
    The Perks of Being a Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky (lucyknows)
    lucyknows: Virgin Suicides is pretty heavy going however there are quite a few films about teenage angst they might work. Some are darker than others and some are quite old but they could work with Perks... Breakfast Club, Heathers, Girl Interrupted, Rebel without a cause, Footloose, The Year my Voice Broke, Donnie Darko, Ferris Bueller's Day Off.… (more)
  5. 10
    A Crime in the Neighborhood by Suzanne Berne (si)
  6. 10
    See How Small by Scott Blackwood (BookshelfMonstrosity)
  7. 10
    Other Voices, Other Rooms by Truman Capote (weener)
    weener: Both books with a srong sense of setting, with a sense of foreboding and decay.
  8. 00
    Paint It Black by Janet Fitch (jbarry)
  9. 00
    Quiet Chaos by Sandro Veronesi (bookmomo)
    bookmomo: Both original and intriguing stories about loss and grieving.
  10. 00
    Whores on the Hill: A Novel by Colleen Curran (jbarry)
  11. 00
    The Fates Will Find Their Way by Hannah Pittard (BookshelfMonstrosity)
  12. 00
    Liars and Saints by Maile Meloy (freddlerabbit)
    freddlerabbit: The styles and narrative perspectives of these two books remind me strongly of one another.
  13. 00
    Practical Jean: A Novel (P.S.) by Trevor Cole (BookshelfMonstrosity)
  14. 12
    We Were the Mulvaneys by Joyce Carol Oates (ainsleytewce)
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English (181)  Dutch (5)  German (2)  Italian (1)  Spanish (1)  Norwegian (1)  Finnish (1)  All (192)
Showing 1-5 of 181 (next | show all)
Eine interessante Erzählweise. Während es eigentlich um die Lisbons und vor allem deren Mädchen geht, kennen die Erzähler sie eigentlich gar nicht. Das Buch besteht nicht aus Dialogen, sondern aus Erzählungen über die Mädchen oder Nachbarn von einem Haufen Schwarmdenkern, die nur von wir oder uns reden, wie in einem Chorus, nur, dass sie teilweise an der Geschichte teilnehmen und nicht nur Beobachter sind. Da sie, selbst wenn sie seltenerweise etwas mit den Mädchen unternehmen niemals wirklich mit ihnen interagieren und bald wieder in die Zuschauerposition verfallen wird man selber in diese Voyeristenposition geschoben die von den Jungs eingenommen wurde, mit all den unbefriedigenden Nebeneffekten, die dadurch entstehen, da die Schwestern nie von Nahem gesehen werden können.

Eugenides hat eine schöne Art, komplexe Dinge wie Gefühle in wenigen Worten beschreiben zu können wodurch das ganze Buch ein einfacheres Leseerlebnis scheint als die Thematik an sich ist. Dennoch musste ich mich etwa die letzten 100 Seiten beinahe durchquälen, da es einfach langsam zu viel des Erzählens wurde und ich doch mal in der Handlung weiter kommen wollte. Nichts gegen Bücher, die sich Zeit nehmen, aber das wurde mir dann doch etwas zu viel.

Dennoch war es ein schönes Buch, von dem ich froh bin, es gelesen zu haben.

An dem Morgen, an dem die letzte Lisbon-Tochter Selbstmord beging – Mary diesmal, mit Schlaftabletten wie Therese -, wussten die Sanitäter schon genau, wo die Schublade mit den Messern war, wo der Gasherd und wo im Keller der Balken, an dem man das Seil festbinden konnte. ( )
  Nomnivor | Jan 12, 2017 |
I think what I like most about this novel was the first person "communal" narrative. It could have sounded derivative of Faulkner with the voyeuristic town prying into the macabre lives of an eccentric family, but it doesn't. It's fresh and captivating while maintaining an ethereal tone. ( )
  Virginia-A | Dec 21, 2016 |
It's been years since I've read a Jeffrey Eugenides book and thought I may have come around to his writing style. Turns out I haven't and I'm still not a fan! Can't win them all... ( )
  dmbkel41 | Dec 7, 2016 |
I like Jeffrey Eugenides, but I prefer Middlesex over The Virgin Suicides. ( )
  JennysBookBag.com | Sep 28, 2016 |
I read this book at exactly the right age - 13 or 14 or so, and I absolutely loved it.

It was brooding and melancholy and sad and sentimental and beautiful. It had a depth to it but the prose was simple so I just read it from almost cover to cover. I remember this book because I read it at a stage where I wasn't entirely sure what kind of books I wanted to read, and I really enjoyed this one.

I do still remember some of the quotations or passages from the book. So, it's stayed with me, and I would definitely recommend it to anyone who hasn't read it. Angsty teenaged girls might not be your favourite subject but that doesn't mean you should avoid it completely. c:

It's very evocative and emotive and it really struck a chord with me. It would be interesting to reread it after so many years. ( )
  lydia1879 | Aug 31, 2016 |
Showing 1-5 of 181 (next | show all)
Mr. Eugenides is blessed with the storyteller's most magical gift, the ability to transform the mundane into the extraordinary.
added by stephmo | editNew York Times, Suzanne Berne (Apr 25, 1993)
 
Adopting a tone simultaneously elegiac and loony, The Virgin Suicides takes the dark stuff of Greek tragedy and reworks it into an eccentric, mesmerizing, frequently hilarious American fantasy about the tyranny of unrequited love, and the unknowable heart of every family on earth — but especially the family next door.
 

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Eugenides, Jeffreyprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Landrum, NickNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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On the morning the last Lisbon daughter took her turn at suicide -- it was Mary this time, and the sleeping pills, like Therese -- the two paramedics arrived at the house knowing exactly where the knife drawer was, and the gas oven, and the beam in the basement from which it was possible to tie a rope.
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Obviously, Doctor… you’ve never been a thirteen-year-old girl.
They knew everything about us though we couldn’t fathom them at all.
The girls were right in choosing to love Trip, because he was the only boy who could keep his mouth shut.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0446670251, Paperback)

Juxtaposing the most common and the most gothic, the humorous and the tragic, author Jeffrey Eugenides creates a vivid and compelling portrait of youth and lost innocence. He takes us back to the elm-lined streets of suburbia in the seventies, and introduces us to the men whose lives have been forever changed by their fierce, awkward obsession with five doomed sisters: brainy Therese, fastidious Mary, ascetic Bonnie, libertine Lux, and pale, saintly Cecilia, whose spectacular demise inaugurates "the year of the suicides." This is the debut novel that caused a sensation and won immediate acclaim from the critics-a tender, wickedly funny tale of love and terror, sex and suicide, memory and imagination.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:14:13 -0400)

(see all 5 descriptions)

The narrator and his friends piece together the events that led up to the suicides of the Lisbon girls--brainy Therese, fastidious Mary, ascetic Bonnie, libertine Lux, and saintly Cecilia.

(summary from another edition)

» see all 5 descriptions

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