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The Writer's Book of Hope: Getting from…
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The Writer's Book of Hope: Getting from Frustration to Publication

by Ralph Keyes

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This book arrived, a gift from donut, in that awful place in the middle of a first draft when you feel lost and discouraged, and on top of that I was so swamped with lifestuff I couldn't figure out wtf I was doing trying to write fiction on top of it all, especially when I feel like my chances of getting published are approximately equivalent to the chances of winning the lottery without buying a ticket. Anyway, donut advised keeping the book near my writing area to flip through in moments of angst, and yup. Here it is. I actually read it straight through, though it would be an easy book to page through at random. I read it in little snippets at my computer, whenever I was waiting for my super slow internet to process something, or when I had those moments when nothing, even the most banal of writing, would come out despite how many times I tapped my fingers anxiously against the keys. I love it. It made me much more hopeful without ever making me roll my eyes at some stupid cheesy business, without feeling like I was holding a vacuous, fake-smiling cheerleader in my hands. :D ( )
  elissajanine | Aug 22, 2009 |
It took me forever to finish this book because I insisted on savoring it. Seriously, I didn't want it to end.

Anyone who has a serious desire to be a writer needs this book. I mean, knowing that an editor once told Rudyard Kipling that he didn't "know how to use the English language..." Harsh! Well, if Kipling can take that kind of insult, so can I. ( )
1 vote amydross | Aug 22, 2006 |
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0805072357, Paperback)

In 1889, the editor of the San Francisco Examiner, having accepted an article from Rudyard Kipling, informed the author that he should not bother to submit any more. "This isn't a kindergarten for amateur writers," the editor wrote. "I'm sorry, Mr. Kipling, but you just don't know how to use the English language." A century later, John Grisham was turned down by sixteen agents before he found representation-and it was only after Hollywood showed an interest in The Firm that publishers began to take him seriously.

The anxiety of rejection is an inevitable part of any writer's development. In this book, Ralph Keyes turns his attention from the difficulty of putting pen to paper-the subject of his acclaimed The Courage to Write -to the frustration of getting the product to the public. Inspiration isn't nearly as important to the successful writer, he argues, as tenacity, and he offers concrete ways to manage the struggle to publish. Drawing on his long experience as a writer and teacher of writing, Keyes provides new insight into the mind-set of publishers, the value of an agent, and the importance of encouragement and hope to the act of authorial creation.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 14:01:45 -0400)

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