HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Corker's Freedom by John Berger
Loading...

Corker's Freedom

by John Berger

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
751227,158 (3.31)6

None.

None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 6 mentions

Prim and proper 64 year old William Corker has decided to change his life. He has walked out on his invalid sister, and is moving into rooms above his office to live a life of freedom. Most of the novel takes place over one day. Corker's thoughts and daydreams alternate with the thoughts and observations of his young assistant Alec, who from a viewpoint of youthful naivetee and incomprehension notes Corker's more and more uncharacteristic actions as the day progresses. The inner lives of Corker and Alec alternate with the mundane details of Corker's employment agency business (in the 1960's when the tools of the trade were index cards and notebooks rather than computers). Berger uses these episodes to present incisive portraits of various job-seekers, including a beautiful young woman casing the joint for her burglar boyfriend and an elderly housekeeper who dreads ending her life in an old folks' home so much that she is willing to work for greatly reduced compensation. The novel reaches its climax in the evening when Corker gives a slide show/lecture on his trip to Vienna. This is presented in as series of comments entitled "What Corker Thinks/Wants to Say," "What Corker Knows," and "What Corker Says." There is an epilogue set two years later which shows Corker still "free," but in an entirely unpredictable way.

This is Berger's first novel, and it is a well-written tragi-comedy. However, I can't say I loved it, as it never called to me when I wasn't reading it.

2 1/2 stars ( )
  arubabookwoman | Jan 9, 2017 |
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

Book description
Haiku summary

No descriptions found.

No library descriptions found.

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.31)
0.5
1 2
1.5
2
2.5 1
3 2
3.5 1
4 6
4.5
5 1

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 128,985,469 books! | Top bar: Always visible