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The Stepsister Scheme (PRINCESS NOVELS) (edition 2009)

by Jim C. Hines

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Member:nicole47
Title:The Stepsister Scheme (PRINCESS NOVELS)
Authors:Jim C. Hines
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The Stepsister Scheme by Jim C. Hines

  1. 20
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    The Fairy Godmother by Mercedes Lackey (Murphy-Jacobs)
    Murphy-Jacobs: Classic fairy tales and folk legends pushed, pulled, and twisted about into tales of romance and adventure. Good sense of humor in both books, and plenty of strong, competent female characters.
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Showing 1-5 of 45 (next | show all)
Wow that was a fun book. I very much enjoy that each of the princesses have both a very large strength and a flaw, keeping them out of Soulless Action Girl realm and making them interesting characters. This book focuses mostly on Danielle (Cinderella) who is one of those incredibly compassionate and forgiving characters that when done wrong can be terribly stupid, but showed a real growth and a willingness to see when Things Had To Happen. Her newness to the group was particularly useful as an introduction to the status quo as well, so I can understand why we're in her POV.

I really REALLY love her companions. Some people roll their eyes at Snow (White) but she's probably one of my favorite sorceress types out there; her flirtatiousness doesn't come out as fanservice-y like in some books, probably due to the fact that instead of just being a Pretty Girl With Magic Who Is The Hero's Love Interest she's incredibly nerdy and spends most of her time in the library, and there IS no love interest (unless you count the gnome she flirts with a lot, which is kind of endearing?). She's also the youngest, and her immaturity was believable. I really look forward to seeing her character grow too.

And then there's Talia (Sleeping Beauty). Oh. My. God. Way to pull out everything I find creepy about the original fairytale and turn around and make her BADASS. Both her and Snow have had some pretty traumatizing things done to them (and in Danielle's case, JUST HAPPENING), and it's really lovely to see how she draws strength from that. But unlike a lot of the badass types of females, you get moments with Talia's vulnerability, which instead of making her weak just makes you kind of love her more for being so refreshingly HUMAN. I also really adore her close relationships with both the Queen and Snow, there was a bit where Snow was talking her through a briar patch which just really warmed me. Women (pretty and talented even) getting along and looking out for each other WHY IS THERE NOT MORE OF THIS IN FANTASY/SCI-FI.

Also, there's some refreshingly normal takes on queerness (humans are still a little uptight about it, but most of the other magical races have varying degrees of normalcy with it) that makes me wish that this had been around when I was 14. Seriously. I look forward to how one thing in particular gets resolved in this realm. Because. Yeah. Awesome. ( )
  cendri | May 30, 2014 |
I liked the characters very much and enjoyed especially the first half of the book. I continued to like the characters all the way through to the end, but I found myself suffering from something I used to suffer from as a younger reader: difficulty accepting a mix of tones in the same story. There's a lot of bawdy humor (not raunchy, just good-humored bawdy) in the book, and light touches, but also terribly dark touches. The heroine Danielle at one point has a nightmare concerning her unborn baby that was absolutely terrifying. I have a feeling I'm going to enjoy Jim's Goblin books with all my heart, as I gather they've got all the humor without the dark tone. It's not that I can't take dark, because I can: I *like* dark. I just don't do so well with dark that comes along with humor. But for all that, I enjoyed the invention in this story mightily, and really loved the three princesses. ( )
1 vote FrancescaForrest | May 12, 2014 |
I liked the characters very much and enjoyed especially the first half of the book. I continued to like the characters all the way through to the end, but I found myself suffering from something I used to suffer from as a younger reader: difficulty accepting a mix of tones in the same story. There's a lot of bawdy humor (not raunchy, just good-humored bawdy) in the book, and light touches, but also terribly dark touches. The heroine Danielle at one point has a nightmare concerning her unborn baby that was absolutely terrifying. I have a feeling I'm going to enjoy Jim's Goblin books with all my heart, as I gather they've got all the humor without the dark tone. It's not that I can't take dark, because I can: I *like* dark. I just don't do so well with dark that comes along with humor. But for all that, I enjoyed the invention in this story mightily, and really loved the three princesses. ( )
  FrancescaForrest | May 12, 2014 |
Interesting take on the whole fairy tale scheme of things. Enjoyed the characterization, although the Sleeping Beauty twist was telegraphed WAY early. ( )
  Con.Rad | May 6, 2014 |
1 ( )
  PhotoS | Feb 17, 2014 |
Showing 1-5 of 45 (next | show all)
Sometimes There Are Men Who Get It Right This author is proof that men can actually grok the full humanity of le deuxième sexe, and write it into their fictional worlds. without having the female characters come across as either absent, ciphers, stereotypes, or sex-fantasies.

You all know about Jim Hines, I expect? The Stepsister Scheme, The Mermaid’s Madness, Red Hood’s Revenge? (What, is that a no in the audience? I’m shocked, simply shocked.) His novels are fairly feminist and usually a lot of fun, and I’m looking forward to seeing if Libriomancer continues in the same vein.

added by feeling.is.first | editTor.com, Liz Bourke (Sep 11, 2012)
 
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To Skylar
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Danielle Whiteshore, formerly Danielle de Glas, would never be a proper princess. Not if the title required her to actually remember so many trifling details.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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"You know how all those old fairy tales take you through lots of scary adventures till you finally reach that inevitable line: 'And they all lived happily ever after...' Guess what? It's not true. Life in never-never land isn't all sweetness and light. Cinderella--whose real name is Danielle Whiteshore (nee Danielle de Glas)--does marry Prince Armand. And...their wedding is a dream come true. But not long after the 'happily ever after,' Danielle is attacked by her stepsister Charlotte, who suddenly has all sorts of magic to call upon. And though Talia--otherwise known as Sleeping Beauty--comes to the rescue (she's a martial arts master, and all those fairy blessings make her almost unbeatable), Charlotte gets away..."--p. [4] of cover.… (more)

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Jim C. Hines is a LibraryThing Author, an author who lists their personal library on LibraryThing.

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