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Hero-Type by Barry Lyga
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Hero-Type (original 2008; edition 2008)

by Barry Lyga

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1831764,645 (3.83)3
Member:sparklecookie
Title:Hero-Type
Authors:Barry Lyga
Info:Houghton Mifflin Books for Children (2008), Hardcover, 304 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:****
Tags:boy, sixteen, high school, violence, bullying, politics, free speech, freedom, censorship, patriotism, politics, media, news, friends, father, brother, guilt, ethics, stalking, crush, identity

Work details

Hero-Type by Barry Lyga (2008)

  1. 10
    Boy Toy by Barry Lyga (clio11)
  2. 00
    Nothing But The Truth: A Documentary Novel by Avi (Runa)
    Runa: The books similarly deal with issues of blind patriotism without deeper thought, one focusing more about supporting the troops, the other about the pledge of allegiance.
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Showing 1-5 of 17 (next | show all)
I shuffled this book ahead a little in my reading queue because the next was about Iran, and I'd read another about Iran recently and wanted to give it some space. Lilttle did I know that this book would have a lot in common with another book I'd recently read The Disreputable History of Frankie Landau-Banks. Both books have a secret society playing pranks, and the pranks are often social commentary (more so in Frankie's story, a little less in Hero.) Both kids, Kevin (Kross,) and Frankie are, in their own way, trying to make their way in High School while standing up for what they believe in. Both face a difficult decision at the end about doing the right thing for themselves, or taking the easy way out. Both books were very good, and despite the similarities, are very different. ( )
  thukpa | Feb 6, 2016 |
I shuffled this book ahead a little in my reading queue because the next was about Iran, and I'd read another about Iran recently and wanted to give it some space. Lilttle did I know that this book would have a lot in common with another book I'd recently read The Disreputable History of Frankie Landau-Banks. Both books have a secret society playing pranks, and the pranks are often social commentary (more so in Frankie's story, a little less in Hero.) Both kids, Kevin (Kross,) and Frankie are, in their own way, trying to make their way in High School while standing up for what they believe in. Both face a difficult decision at the end about doing the right thing for themselves, or taking the easy way out. Both books were very good, and despite the similarities, are very different. ( )
  thukpa | Feb 6, 2016 |
I shuffled this book ahead a little in my reading queue because the next was about Iran, and I'd read another about Iran recently and wanted to give it some space. Lilttle did I know that this book would have a lot in common with another book I'd recently read The Disreputable History of Frankie Landau-Banks. Both books have a secret society playing pranks, and the pranks are often social commentary (more so in Frankie's story, a little less in Hero.) Both kids, Kevin (Kross,) and Frankie are, in their own way, trying to make their way in High School while standing up for what they believe in. Both face a difficult decision at the end about doing the right thing for themselves, or taking the easy way out. Both books were very good, and despite the similarities, are very different. ( )
  thukpa | Feb 5, 2016 |
I didn't really like the main character or the premise and ideas portrayed in the story. ( )
  Jen.ODriscoll.Lemon | Jan 23, 2016 |
I didn't really like the main character or the premise and ideas portrayed in the story. ( )
  Jen.ODriscoll.Lemon | Jan 23, 2016 |
Showing 1-5 of 17 (next | show all)
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Epigraph
Dedication
Dedicated to Captain Peter G. Madriñan and Major Gregory C. Tine, United States Army, both serving in the Middle East as I write this.

Fine soldiers, better friends.
First words
You know those pictures of fat people?
Quotations
No one's mother should be a hot lesbian. It should be illegal or something.
What's the point of freedom of speech if everyone says and thinks the same thing anyway?  What's the point of freedom of speech if everyone is forced to say the same thing?  Or afraid to say anything different?
Give us guns and bombs and helicopter support and tell a bunch of kids to make foreign policy work.  Kill people to save people's lives.  Blow things up to build them up.  And what's the result?  Ten years, fifteen years later, we're right back there again, doing it all over again.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0547076630, Hardcover)

Everyone is treating Kevin as a hero. He was in the right place and the right time and he saved a girl from being murdered. Only Kevin knows though, why he was able to save her. Things get even more complicated when Kevin is seen removing two patriotic “Support the Troops” ribbons from his car bumper. Now the town that lauded him as a hero turns on him, calling him unpatriotic. Kevin, who hadn't thought much about it up to then, becomes politcially engaged, suddenly questioning what exactly supporting the troops or even saying the pledge of allegiance every day means.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:12:09 -0400)

Feeling awkward and ugly is only one reason sixteen-year-old Kevin is uncomfortable with the publicity surrounding his act of accidental heroism, but when a reporter photographs him apparently being unpatriotic, he steps into the limelight to encourage people to think about what the symbols of freedom really mean.… (more)

(summary from another edition)

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