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Military Expenditures and Economic Growth by…
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Military Expenditures and Economic Growth

by Jasen Castillo, Ashley J. Tellis (Author)

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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Jasen Castilloprimary authorall editionscalculated
Tellis, Ashley J.Authormain authorall editionsconfirmed
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0833028960, Paperback)

This study explores the historical relationship between economic growth and military expenditures in five great power countries: Germany, France, Russia, Japan, and the United States. Using statistical and case-study methodologies, the authors examine how each country's military expenditures responded to increases in economic output levels and in economic growth during the period 1870-1939, and they offer explanations for the relationship in each country. If historical experience holds true, economic growth in some of the present-day candidates for great-power status will spur them to increase the growth rate of their military expenditures and, as a result, their military capabilities. But each country is unique, and strong economic growth need not imply a commensurate expansion of military spending or capability. History suggests that preceived threats from abroad may be the most important factor leading potential great powers to increase military expenditures.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:13:36 -0400)

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