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We Take This Man by Candice Dow
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We Take This Man

by Candice Dow

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Reviewed by Jamaica
Book provided by the publisher for review
Originally posted at Romancing the Book

I have to say I was somewhat skeptical when I picked up this book. First, I’m usually not a fan of books that are tag-team written by two authors. In my experience, books that have multiple authors are usually a muddle of different voices working against each other. Plus, book is about a three-way marriage—-and the book’s cover makes no secret about its subject matter, with a tuxedoed groom with a white-gowned bride on each arm. I’m not usually a fan of the love-triangle story, so I went into this book waving a lot of red flags around. But Dow and Poole’s tight, focused writing, along with their very original take on the old love-triangle theme, make this book well worth a read.

The plot centers around Dwight Wilson, a successful software executive, his longtime wife Tracey, and his newfound love Alicia, whom he meets when he has to move away from his home in Jacksonville, Florida to Washington DC as part of a job transfer. Tracey is settled into her life in Florida and refuses to move to Washington, forcing Dwight to enter into a long-distance marriage. The marriage begins to fall apart, and Dwight begins romancing Alicia Dixon on the side. Dwight files for divorce, and he marries Alicia when his divorce is final so they can both begin a new life in Washington—or so he thinks. But unbeknownst to him, back in Florida Tracey contests the divorce at the last possible second and it doesn’t go through—making Dwight a bigamist. All manner of shenanigans occur, to the point that when Tracey and Dwight find out that their “husband” is simultaneously married to two different women, they decide to try out a “three-way” marriage arrangement so they can both keep their man. But guess what? It doesn’t work. The whole arrangement falls apart in the most catastrophic way possible.

Dow and Poole made clever use of their different writing styles and author voices by having the narrative switch back and forth between the two women in the love triangle. This works very well. Each chapter is dedicated either to Tracey—the longtime, settled wife and mother—-or Alicia, the “other woman” who becomes a wife and mother herself—offering the reader a chance to get inside both women’s heads. Though the plot becomes more and more implausible—almost soap-opera-like at times—-Dow and Poole’s unique voices and strong characterizations keep the reader hooked at all times. Perhaps the book’s greatest strength is its snapshot-like ability to capture the nuances of upper-class African-American society, along with its biting social commentary on some of that segment of society’s traditions, taboos, and unspoken rules of love and marriage.

We Take This Man is a complex-yet-satisfying tale that asks a lot of tough moral questions, and resolves those questions in ways that you probably won’t expect. Authors Dow and Poole make up a unique and memorable writing team. Definitely pick this one up—you won’t regret it! ( )
  RtB | Sep 26, 2013 |
This review was written for LibraryThing Early Reviewers.
I'm reviewing this, but only because I have to for Early Reviewers. When I read the snippet about this book, it has such promise to be a fresh, humour story about 2 women that want the same man. Turns out, it was supposed to be some kind of social commentary that helped reinforce many unflattering stereotypes. If I could sue someone for false advertising regarding this book, I would.

The wife was annoying, uncompromising and a brat. The girlfriend was okay until she went all nut-casey. The husband was a spineless bastard. The plot, by the end, was totally ridiculous and flimsy. This was neither funny, light-hearded or enjoyable and if I never see another book by either of these women, I'll be a happier person. ( )
  janeycanuck | Aug 2, 2009 |
This review was written for LibraryThing Early Reviewers.
I'm not quite sure how I felt about this book. The writing was great, which contributed greatly to the reason I kept reading, but they way the two women were portrayed seriously bothered me. Sure, it's a fictional story, but I found myself rolling my eyes at several intervals. While the unbelievable lives of these characters drove me to finish the book to see how the drama would unfold, the way the last few chapters were thrown together left much to be desired. ( )
  mabes | Jul 27, 2009 |
This review was written for LibraryThing Early Reviewers.
What would have to happen for you to agree to share your husband or boyfriend with someone? Is there any circumstance that would make you decide to push your dreams aside, and unselfishly share your man with someone else?

Alicia and Tracey are both faced with these questions and come to the conclusion that the only way that they can hold onto their man and the only way that their kids can have both parents around is to share Dwight. It was interesting to see how this decision affected their relationships with each other and with those who found out about their arrangement.

We Take This Man really reminded me of a soap opera with the drama and fights between Dwight and Tracey, and the powerful love affair between Alicia and Dwight. I was frustrated with both women and their unwise decisions.

It was a quick read and held my attention, but this book is not for the easily offended. It does deal with real life issues such as infidelity, trust, and polygamy, but some of the content is pretty graphic. There is a good deal of swearing, and some crude descriptions of sex scenes.

I had a really hard time relating to either of the women in this story. Tracey, Dwight's wife, was so selfish, and I couldn't understand why she was so attached to her house that she wouldn't move with her husband. I thought she was justifiable in her anger at her husband when he took a new job without telling her, but her stubbornness in staying behind was frustrating.

I could understand Alicia's actions a little bit more. She knows she is getting involved with a married man, but "knows" that he is separating from his wife.

I really didn't like Dwight though. I could understand that he wasn't feeling loved in his relationship with his wife, and that he needed someone to comfort him, but it really came down to him making a decision between the two ladies and it seemed like he wasn't willing to make a decision if he didn't have to.

Towards the end of the book I just wanted to take them to task and ask them what they thought they were doing. They all had faults and flaws and their relationships were complicated. The whole section of the book where they are sharing Dwight made me feel frustrated and sad for those ladies. I could never live under those circumstances and I have a hard time understanding how anyone would voluntarily sit by while someone else was messing around with their husband or boyfriend. Of course the guy was okay with it - he had two women competing to meet his every need.

Overall I came away from this book not liking any of the characters. The subject matter did provoke a lot of thought though. ( )
  akreese | Jul 21, 2009 |
This review was written for LibraryThing Early Reviewers.
Dwight Wilson is a successful software executive. He has a beautiful family and is happily married to Tracey, a woman he's known since they were teenagers. They have two young daughters and live well in Jacksonville, FL. When he receives a big raise and a transfer to Maryland Tracey doesn't want to leave her life and her dream home in the south. Dwight is confident the family can successfully keep a long distance relationship but it isn't long before it begins to take a toll. Tracey is not trying very hard to make it work either. When he meets Alice at work he forms a friendship and then becomes attracted to her and all of the good qualities his wife doesn't have. But Alice refuses to become involved with a married man. When Tracey later gives Dwight an ultimatum, move back home or she will divorce him, Dwight has had enough and serves her with the papers himself. He now feels free to pursue a relationship with Alicia. His wife eventually realizes her mistake in forcing him to do what she demands and decides to contest the divorce at the last minute. But Dwight doesn't know that and marries Alicia. The woman who is now pregnant with his child.

This story is told in alternating chapters of narration between the two women. When I read the back cover I thought this was going to be more a comedy of errors and have a type of "chick lit" flavor to it. As I read it I realized that it had too much drama and heartache for that. Unfortunately it probably strikes very close to home for the many fractured families that are all too common now days. Although each of these characters appeared to be strong I felt they all were basically insecure. They weren't able to make decisions and stick with them. I can't imagine being so impulsive about such important events in my life. Although I could feel their pain I wanted to know more about these characters' backgrounds and what brought them here. I realize that I may not agree with their decisions but I did want to understand them. While it must have been heartbreaking to be in their dilemma I had a hard time having sympathy for these characters. I often found their actions and reactions to be unbelievable. It seemed so easy for them to flip flop in their relationships with Dwight. I did find the concept to be very interesting though. No matter what they decided to do, it would affect all of them for the rest of their lives. ( )
  Wrighty | Apr 6, 2009 |
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0446501832, Paperback)

Dwight and Tracey Wilson are living the ideal life with their two children in a brand new home in Florida. They are both excited when Dwight is offered a promotion at work, but the downside is that the job is located in Maryland. After much discussion, Tracey decides that she does not want to leave their new house. Dwight makes the decision to accept the position and return home on weekends.


Alicia Dixon has spent her life hating and not trusting men after her father mistreated her mother, but she can't help but fall for the new guy in her company...Dwight. They both try to fight their attraction to one another, but it proves to be a losing battle-Alicia is everything that his southern wife is not.


When Alicia ends up pregnant, Dwight decides to end things with Tracey, but the process proves not to be as easy as Dwight had hoped.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:08:15 -0400)

"Dwight and Tracey Wilson are living the ideal life with their two children in a brand new home in Florida. They are both excited when Dwight is offered a promotion at work, but the downside is that the job is located in Maryland. After much discussion, Tracey decides that she does not want to leave their new house. Dwight makes the decision to accept the position and return home on weekends. Alicia Dixon has spent her life hating and not trusting men after her father mistreated her mother, but she can't help but fall for the new guy in her company...Dwight. They both try to fight their attraction to one another, but it proves to be a losing battle-Alicia is everything that his southern wife is not.Whe n Alicia ends up pregnant, Dwight decides to end things with Tracey, but the process proves not to be as easy as Dwight had hoped. " --- from publisher's description.… (more)

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