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Grandma Lois Remembers (What Was It Like,…
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Grandma Lois Remembers (What Was It Like, Grandma?)

by Ann Morris, Peter Linenthal (Photographer/Illustrator)

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Showing 1-5 of 7 (next | show all)
In my opinion, this is a good book. The first reason I liked this book was because the illustrations were actual photo graphs of the family. When the author discussed Erick’s relationships with family member, the photographs allowed the reader to see these strong relationships. When it says, “Nakia takes him [Erick] to the playground. They are pals. Sometimes Erick pushes Nakia on the swing,” the reader is easily able to see a picture of Erick pushing Nakia on a swing. They both have big smiles on their faces which tells the reader that they have a mutually positive relationship. Another reason I liked this book was because it was non-fiction. It used engaging tactics such as occasionally having large, colorful font, and pictures with captions to tell the story of Erick’s family. Having large, colorful font draws readers in because it allows their eyes to settle on something more engaging. Including pictures with captions helps the readers connect what they read to real images from the family. The book also included a recipe for sweet potato pie which is what Grandma Lois teaches her family to make on holidays. The message of the story is that all families have similarities and differences. This books gives the perspective of one family which allows readers to broaden their perspectives on the culture and relate certain aspects back to their own family. ( )
  KaseyRosen | Sep 26, 2016 |
I liked this book for many reasons. I liked how the story compared two generations. The grandma and the grandson portray their own experiences. I think this is important because readers can learn that everyone has different perspectives on life because of the experiences they have encountered. I also enjoyed the photographs of the family because it adds authenticity to the story. It also shows that all families may look different, but participate in similar hobbies and activities. I also liked how the author provided personal recipes and games at the end of the book. This adds an interactive aspect to the book after the story is finished. The big idea of the story is to love and appreciate your family. ( )
  pnieme1 | Apr 19, 2015 |
I liked this book for many reasons. I liked how the story compared two generations. The grandma and the grandson portray their own experiences. I think this is important because readers can learn that everyone has different perspectives on life because of the experiences they have encountered. I also enjoyed the photographs of the family because it adds authenticity to the story. It also shows that all families may look different, but participate in similar hobbies and activities. I also liked how the author provided personal recipes and games at the end of the book. This adds an interactive aspect to the book after the story is finished. The big idea of the story is to love and appreciate your family. ( )
  ktran4 | Apr 17, 2015 |
At the start of this book, photos were used to show relationships between the little boy in the book, Erick, and each of his family members. Specifically, the book focuses on Erick’s grandmother, who flips through different photographs and tells her grandson about her childhood and how she was raised. She tells about how she lived in Birmingham Alabama, and needed to ride in the back of the trolley through the city to get to work. When the boy tells the story of how “Grandma Lois said that the black and white people had to use separate drinking fountains” he is using language that will appeal to children’s sense of curiosity and have them wonder why it was like that back then. Honing in on a small part of segregation back when Erick’s grandmother was a child helps children to understand that black and white people used separate public things back then.
The old pictures displayed in the book give children an insight as to what people looked like, dressed like, the jobs they worked in, and what their houses looked like. I think that in order to give children a history lesson, pictures are crucial so they could really imagine the time period. Grandma Lois explains that her family was better off than most: she had a house with a porch, a car, her dad had a job at a steel factory, but she did not have running water or electricity.
I think that this book is important because it starts out by describing a boy and his family, and changes topics to focus on a bigger issue that children may not be aware of, like the civil rights movement. It’s important for American children to understand American history at a young age that was they are always “in the know” on more current issues, due to things that may have happened in the past. ( )
  tmalon4 | Feb 16, 2015 |
This book was about a grandmother who told her grandson the story of how she grew up in the segregated city of Birmingham. She talked about how life was then, and how it is now. I really liked this book for two reasons. The first reason I liked it was because it did not have ordinary illustrations. There were actual photos included throughout this book. I thought that was important because it not only helped the reader to visualize the information, but it also helped the reader to get a realistic understanding of what was going on. Not only were there actual photos, but there were also captions under the photos to explain what was going on in the picture, and this was very helpful.
The second reason I liked this book was because it offered many "Do-it-Yourself" activities/projects: a sing-a-long, a sweet potato pie do-it-together recipe, and a family tree at the back of the book. I feel as though incorporating these type things in a book helps the reader feel a part of the story. ( )
  JeNeeH | Feb 15, 2015 |
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Morris, AnnAuthorprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Linenthal, PeterPhotographer/Illustratormain authorall editionsconfirmed
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0761323163, Library Binding)

An African American grandmother relates family and cultural history to her grandson in their Queens, New York, apartment as she tells of growing up in segregated Birmingham, Alabama. Includes a recipe and the words to Amazing Grace.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:23:41 -0400)

An African American grandmother relates family and cultural history to her grandson in their Queens, New York, apartment as she tells of growing up in segregated Birmingham, Alabama. Includes a recipe and the words to Amazing Grace.

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