HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Piano concerto No 1 in B flat minor by Peter…
Loading...

Piano concerto No 1 in B flat minor

by Peter Ilich Tchaikovsky

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations
271402,159 (4.6)None

None.

None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

Peter Tchaikovsky (1840–1893)
Concerto for Piano and Orchestra No. 1 in B flat minor, Op. 23

[1] I. Allegro non troppo e molto maestoso – Allegro con spirito
[2] II. Andantino semplice
[3] III. Allegro con fuoco

Alexander Scriabin (1872–1915)
Four Pieces, Op. 51
(1906)
[4] Fragilité (Allegretto)
[5] Prélude (Lugubre)
[6] Poème ailé
[7] Danse languide
[8] Etude in C sharp minor, Op. 42 No. 5 (1903)

Yevgeny Kissin, piano
Berliner Philharmoniker
Herbert von Karajan


Recorded: December 1988, Philharmonie, Berlin (Live).

Deutsche Grammophon, 1989. TT 52'33. Liner notes by John Warrack.

======================================

This is the same performance of Tchaikovsky’s concerto that has been released on DVD. Certainly, it is better experienced on video (including the sound). There may be minor differences, for instance because it’s easier to incorporate material from rehearsals in the audio version, but I don’t consider this a fruitful field of comparative listening. It is the same interpretation, and a fine one too. Karajan and Kissin take full ten minutes longer than Horowitz and Toscanini did 35–40 years ago, but the music doesn’t seem to suffer from that elongation. On the whole, I agree with Harold Schonberg that the modern fashion of slowing down is harmful rather than beneficial, but there are occasional exceptions when it does produce, if not better performances, at least equally valid interpretations. The brief Scriabin pieces, altogether some ten minutes, were apparently recorded at the same time, not as encores but probably while Kissin warmed up his fingers. It is rather awe-inspiring that he did so with the “murderous” (Schonberg again) Etude Op. 42 No. 5. John Warrack is suitably knowledgeable about Tchaikovsky to provide expert liner notes. So he does. ( )
1 vote Waldstein | May 21, 2016 |
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

Book description
Haiku summary

No descriptions found.

No library descriptions found.

Quick Links

Swap Ebooks Audio
1 pay

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (4.6)
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5
3
3.5
4 2
4.5
5 3

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

You are using the new servers! | About | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 117,009,239 books! | Top bar: Always visible