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Scattershot: My Bipolar Family by David…
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Scattershot: My Bipolar Family

by David Lovelace

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This is a memoir of a man with bipolar disorder. Of the 5 family members, only his sister Peggy is free from this disabling mental illness. David gives a rarely seen inside look at this horrible disease and all it's ramifications. Gratefully he has battled and "won" and is able to help the others in his family cope. I am very thankful to this author for writing this book. ( )
  Brenda63 | Feb 3, 2013 |
It was mildly entertaining at the best of times and a struggle to make it through at the worst of times, when reading Scattershot. This is the true story of a family severely affected by bipolarity, to the tune of four out of five members being afflicted. I did learn a bit more about the illness through the episodic writing, but felt the lack of flow made it a less than enjoyable read when waiting for a real story to emerge. However, life stories don’t always have a proper flow, and certainly not if you’re manic depressive, so I can’t fault it too much in that regard.

Considering that statistics show that 1 in 5 sufferers of bipolar disorder will commit suicide, a point that David Lovelace brings up a couple of times throughout his book, it is evident how strong the Lovelace family was (at least by the printing of this memoir) to have not have taken any of their own lives. Unfortunately I was so bored in some parts of the book that I contemplated taking mine...
  PamelaReads | Aug 5, 2011 |
It was mildly entertaining at the best of times and a struggle to make it through at the worst of times, when reading Scattershot. This is the true story of a family severely affected by bipolarity, to the tune of four out of five members being afflicted. I did learn a bit more about the illness through the episodic writing, but felt the lack of flow made it a less than enjoyable read when waiting for a real story to emerge. However, life stories don’t always have a proper flow, and certainly not if you’re manic depressive, so I can’t fault it too much in that regard.

Considering that statistics show that 1 in 5 sufferers of bipolar disorder will commit suicide, a point that David Lovelace brings up a couple of times throughout his book, it is evident how strong the Lovelace family was (at least by the printing of this memoir) to have not have taken any of their own lives. Unfortunately I was so bored in some parts of the book that I contemplated taking mine...

Check out more of my reviews at BookSnakeReviews ( )
1 vote PeachyTO | Apr 7, 2010 |
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0525950788, Hardcover)

David Lovelace, along his brother and both his parents, is bipolar. This is his extraordinary and vivid memoir of life within his memorable, maddening, loving and unique family. Full Blown is Lovelace's poignant, humorous, and vivid account of growing up and coming to terms with the highs and lows of manic depression. David's father was a Princeton-trained theology professor deemed too eccentric for the ministry and his mother battled depression all her life. Manic episodes were part of family life - they called them the 'whim-whams'. David was a teenager when his first serious depression hit, and at college when he first became manic. He ran to escape it - to Mexico, South America and then New York, to drugs and alcohol - before he realised the futility of running. A father himself, a son and a brother, David's matter-of-fact approach to growing up surrounded by the unique creativity often sparked by manic depression is compelling. In the vein of Stuart, A Life Backwards and Augusten Burroughs' Running with Scissors , David's poetic ability to detail the unique highs and harrowing lows makes a remarkable and gripping read.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:07:42 -0400)

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An account of the author's predominantly bipolar family discusses his parents' and brother's struggles with their symptoms, his own development of bipolar disorder, and his observations on the connection between his family's illness and their religious faith.… (more)

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