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Thousand and One Egyptian Nights: An…
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Thousand and One Egyptian Nights: An American Christian Among Muslims

by Jennifer Drago

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"Two years after September 11, 2001, many Christians and others in the west had
turned a cold shoulder and a blind eye to Muslims in the Middle East. Jennifer
Drago and her family saw things differently. They responded to a radical call
that uprooted them from their life and work with refugees in the United States
and planted them among Muslims and Coptic Christians in Egypt. Jennifer now
recounts the challenges and rewards of this eye-opening journey into the heart
of the Islamic world." --back cover
  collectionmcc | Mar 6, 2018 |
NCLA Review -Americans Brad and Jennifer Drago lived for three years in Egypt to immerse their family (children ages 8, 10, 12) in another culture. And to try “in a small way to bridge the gap of misunderstanding between Americans and Arabs, between Muslims and Christians.” In September 2003, they settled in the small town of Beni Suef, where Brad and Jennifer taught school and they all grappled with a whole new world. In 1001 Nights Jennifer vividly chronicles their adventures, big and small, and their encounters with a culture so different from their own. She wept for the abused wife next door, but Christian and Muslim friends alike insisted there was absolutely nothing she could do to stop it. She found that Egyptians are as entrenched in tradition as Americans are shaped by their culture. Yet their story is overwhelmingly positive. The entire Drago family had an amazing tolerance for, and in time a greater understanding of, the lifestyle of their Egyptian friends. That period was an eye opener not only for them, but fortunately for Arabs as well. An excellent book for church discussion groups! Rating: 4—DKW ( )
  ncla | Jun 30, 2008 |
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0836193652, Paperback)

Two years after September 11, 2001, many Christians and others in the west had turned a cold shoulder and a blind eye to Muslims in the Middle East. Jennifer Drago and her family saw things differently. They heard a radical call, one that would uproot them from their life and work with refugees in the United States and plant them among conservative Muslims in Egypt.

Now Jennifer recounts the challenges and rewards of this eye-opening journey into the heart of the Islamic world, where she and her family lived not as Americans in Egypt, but as Christians among Muslims.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:15:20 -0400)

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