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Pale Blue Dot: a Vision of the Human Future in Space (original 1994; edition 1997)

by Carl Sagan

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1,589124,586 (4.25)16
Member:lewissmith4
Title:Pale Blue Dot: a Vision of the Human Future in Space
Authors:Carl Sagan
Info:Ballantine Books Inc. (1997), Edition: Ballantine Books ed, Paperback, 360 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:****
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Pale Blue Dot : A Vision of the Human Future in Space by Carl Sagan (1994)

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Showing 1-5 of 12 (next | show all)
"A Pale Blue Dot" is not fiction - it is incredible insightful scientific musings and a walk through planets and moons of our solar system - but it feels like fiction. Sagan's writing style is full of amazement, wisdom and poetry, and just like a great fiction book it is hard to put down.

When that's said, he spends the first chapters of the book beating on the Church / centrist views in all forms but mostly the Church. I find that somewhat unnecessary - at least to beat that much, but it appears to be his pet peeve, so I put up with it.

The fascinating parts of the book start after that. They are about the worlds in our solar system, how planets and moons form, and the vision for human Space exploration. Fantastic. If it was science fiction it would be great science fiction (just add characters), but it is science which just makes it even greater.

The book is of course 20 years old, and a lot has been discovered since it was written, but mostly not described as eloquently as Sagan can do it. My husband and I read the book together second time (I read it up for him as goodnight story), and have used Wikipedia on my tablet to update ourselves about the later discoveries after each chapter, so when we finish reading about a planet or moon we go to Wikipedia to get the latest space exploration updates about it before moving on. I can recommend that reading strategy. ( )
  Saltvand | Apr 8, 2014 |
In Cosmos, the late astronomer Carl Sagan cast his gaze over the magnificent mystery of the Universe and made it accessible to millions of people around the world. Now in this stunning sequel, Carl Sagan completes his revolutionary journey through space and time.

Future generations will look back on our epoch as the time when the human race finally broke into a radically new frontier--space. In Pale Blue Dot Sagan traces the spellbinding history of our launch into the cosmos and assesses the future that looms before us as we move out into our own solar system and on to distant galaxies beyond. The exploration and eventual settlement of other worlds is neither a fantasy nor luxury, insists Sagan, but rather a necessary condition for the survival of the human race. ( )
  MarkBeronte | Jan 7, 2014 |
Wonderful and mind expanding book. It makes a great case for the space program and human exploration of space, but does not stop there. Entertaining and filled with great science. ( )
  lapomelzi | May 4, 2013 |
This book had SO much information packed in a very accessable way. All about our solar system, space exploration, the planets and moons, and all kinds of things. It's so enjoyable to read and will help you understand the amazing place we live. Not earth, folks... the universe. ( )
  amaraduende | Mar 30, 2013 |
All though I have the greatest respect for Dr. Carl Sagan, he does tend to let his 'political opinions' leak out. It became very obvious to me that Dr. Sagan has no time for conservatives or Republicans in general.

That said, this book is outstanding if one considers the date it was published. Young astronomers and environmentalists will see and learn about our small but precious Earth.

The big take away for me was that we 'humans', are not the center of anything but our own imaginations. Our place in the cosmos is so insignificant, that it's not even worth mentioning. And to think we are so smart, is laughable.

Thank you Dr. Sagan, and rest well.

Jim DeManche
Amateur Astronomer ( )
  jimdemanche | Jun 19, 2012 |
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0345376595, Paperback)

"FASCINATING . . . MEMORABLE . . . REVEALING . . . PERHAPS THE BEST OF CARL SAGAN'S BOOKS."
--The Washington Post Book World (front page review)

In Cosmos, the late astronomer Carl Sagan cast his gaze over the magnificent mystery of the Universe and made it accessible to millions of people around the world. Now in this stunning sequel, Carl Sagan completes his revolutionary journey through space and time.

Future generations will look back on our epoch as the time when the human race finally broke into a radically new frontier--space. In Pale Blue Dot Sagan traces the spellbinding history of our launch into the cosmos and assesses the future that looms before us as we move out into our own solar system and on to distant galaxies beyond. The exploration and eventual settlement of other worlds is neither a fantasy nor luxury, insists Sagan, but rather a necessary condition for the survival of the human race.

"TAKES READERS FAR BEYOND Cosmos . . . Sagan sees humanity's future in the stars."
--Chicago Tribune

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 14:05:49 -0400)

(see all 3 descriptions)

Examines humankind's changing awareness of its place in the universe and the rich potential of human ventures into the world beyond Earth

(summary from another edition)

» see all 3 descriptions

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