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Melmoth the Wanderer by Charles Robert…
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Melmoth the Wanderer (1820)

by Charles Robert Maturin

Other authors: See the other authors section.

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English (18)  French (1)  Spanish (1)  All languages (20)
Showing 1-5 of 18 (next | show all)
avrei dato 2,70.....
storia gotica veramente strana, struttura della trama a scatola cinese..... che detto terra terra...un gran casino ad incastro...
non che questa non sia interessante ed inquietante anzi... ma e' infarcita da continue situazioni prolisse e lente da impazzirne!!!
la Base della storia e' molto interessante ed intrigante devo dire..... peccato per il contorno nella struttura della narrazione... ( )
  Mandane75 | Nov 16, 2018 |
avrei dato 2,70.....
storia gotica veramente strana, struttura della trama a scatola cinese..... che detto terra terra...un gran casino ad incastro...
non che questa non sia interessante ed inquietante anzi... ma e' infarcita da continue situazioni prolisse e lente da impazzirne!!!
la Base della storia e' molto interessante ed intrigante devo dire..... peccato per il contorno nella struttura della narrazione... ( )
  Mandane75 | Nov 16, 2018 |
“Miserable wretch that I am! At this moment, a voice from the bottom of my heart asks me ‘Whom hast thou loved so much? Was it man or God, that thou darest to compare thyself with her who knelt, and wept—not before a mortal idol, but at the feet of an incarnate divinity?’”

—Melmoth the Wanderer by Charles Maturin

What a great beginning, dripping in all the best gothic goo and sticking to the back of the brain. Hidden portraits with hidden histories in houses of decrepitude and ancient sins. Torture, bloody death under trampling hooves, breaking spirits on wheels and in dungeons and looming over cliffs toward hell-tossed oceans. I wanted to love this book. And the neck had been so damn snug in that lunette. What happened? Well, while the blade went singing to that doomed soul kneeling in puddles of blood, the narrative had been hijacked and hijacked again and hijacked once more. Hi-hi-high treasonous prose! Not remaining faithful to the set-up, playing Russian nesting dolls with the plot, whisking away the cobwebs only to find that behind that rusting and molding door is another goddamn door. Goddamn! That’s right, Melmoth sold his soul to the Devil and searched the world for a sucker to take his dark mantle from off his shoulders—kind of a reverse of Diogenes with demon’s blood in the lamp instead of light. So, like many other Gothic tales of its time, I was disappointed. Yet, in awe when some powerful passage would clout me at the base of the nose when nearly nodding off. Did he just . . . ?

It would take the likes of Poe to distill this kind of story into a truly affecting work. And since I’m a condenser by nature, a writer who cuts and squeezes until all the infection is out, to the detriment of the body, maybe, I couldn’t help but wish this thing move along a bit more briskly. Let the bloodletting commence! But without this kind of work, with its kind of unique power and sutured narrative to one hundred and fifty-year-old flesh, there would never have been a tradition of dark yet metaphysical literature to challenge readers and lovers of the macabre. Not all vampires are sparkly. Not all depictions of the Devil are devilish. (“The Brothers Karamazov” attests to the truth of that.) Not all narratives need be straight-forward—bent by scabrous fingers on dark designs. I just wish “Melmoth the Wanderer” hadn’t wandered so much. ( )
  ToddSherman | Aug 24, 2017 |
One of the best novels ever written. It was long, tedious and a Chinese puzzle box full of wonder. You have to really stay on your toes to understand this story but when it is all done and you have wiped the blood from your eyes you will thank yourself. Finishing it is a major achievement for anyone who reads on a regular basis. I wonder what this would have been like if Umberto Eco had penned it. It takes real stamina. ( )
2 vote Joe73 | Apr 26, 2017 |
Yes, but Kindle.
  Xleptodactylous | Apr 7, 2015 |
Showing 1-5 of 18 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (18 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Maturin, Charles Robertprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Baldick, ChrisIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Grant, DouglasEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Sage, VictorEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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In the autumn of 1816, John Melmoth, a student in Trinity College, Dublin, quitted it to attend a dying uncle on whom his hopes for independence chiefly rested.
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Had I been told such a story of another, I would have denounced him as the most reckless and desperate being on earth - yet I was the man. p.212
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 014044761X, Paperback)

Created by an Irish clergyman, Melmoth is one of the most fiendish characters in literature. In a satanic bargain, Melmoth exchanges his soul for immortality. The story of his tortured wanderings through the centuries is pieced together through those who have been implored by Melmoth to take over his pact with the devil. Influenced by the Gothic romances of the late 18th century, Maturin's diabolic tale raised the genre to a new and macabre pitch. Its many admirers include Poe, Balzac, Oscar Wilde and Baudelaire.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:00:50 -0400)

(see all 4 descriptions)

"In a satanic bargain, Melmoth has sold his soul in exchange for immortality and now preys on the helpless in their darkest moments, offering to ease their suffering if they will take his place and release him from his tortured wanderings. His story is pieced together by those who have glimpsed his eerie existence over the centuries--from a prisoner in the clutches of the Spanish Inquisition to a man incarcerated in a London lunatic asylum." -- back cover.… (more)

» see all 2 descriptions

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Penguin Australia

2 editions of this book were published by Penguin Australia.

Editions: 014044761X, 0141199296

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