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Heroides. Amores by Ovidius
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Heroides. Amores

by Ovidius

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» See also 2 mentions

Hilarious. ( )
  wrappedupinbooks | Sep 26, 2006 |
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» Add other authors (6 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Ovidiusprimary authorall editionscalculated
Goold, G. P.Editorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Showerman, GrantTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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A WORD FROM THE TRANSLATOR
The complete conveyance of intellectual content, form, and emotional content from one language to another, above all in the case of poetry, is impossible.
OVID'S LIFE
Publius Ovidius Naso was born at Sulmo, a city about ninety miles east of Rome, in the country of the Paeligni, on March 20, 43 B.C., the year of the second triumvirate, composed of Augustus, Antony, and Lepidus, and the year of the proscription and death of the Ciceros.
Hanc tua Penelope lento tibi mittit, Ulixe --
nil mihi rescribas tu tamen; ipse veni!
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0674990455, Hardcover)

Ovid (Publius Ovidius Naso, 43 BCE–17 CE), born at Sulmo, studied rhetoric and law at Rome. Later he did considerable public service there, and otherwise devoted himself to poetry and to society. Famous at first, he offended the emperor Augustus by his Ars Amatoria, and was banished because of this work and some other reason unknown to us, and dwelt in the cold and primitive town of Tomis on the Black Sea. He continued writing poetry, a kindly man, leading a temperate life. He died in exile.

Ovid's main surviving works are the Metamorphoses, a source of inspiration to artists and poets including Chaucer and Shakespeare; the Fasti, a poetic treatment of the Roman year of which Ovid finished only half; the Amores, love poems; the Ars Amatoria, not moral but clever and in parts beautiful; Heroides, fictitious love letters by legendary women to absent husbands; and the dismal works written in exile: the Tristia, appeals to persons including his wife and also the emperor; and similar Epistulae ex Ponto. Poetry came naturally to Ovid, who at his best is lively, graphic and lucid.

The Loeb Classical Library edition of Ovid is in six volumes.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:16:20 -0400)

Ovid (Publius Ovidius Naso, 43 BCE-17 CE), born at Sulmo, studied rhetoric and law at Rome. Later he did considerable public service there, and otherwise devoted himself to poetry and to society. Famous at first, he offended the emperor Augustus by his Ars Amatoria, and was banished because of this work and some other reason unknown to us, and dwelt in the cold and primitive town of Tomis on the Black Sea. He continued writing poetry, a kindly man, leading a temperate life. He died in exile. Ovid's main surviving works are the Metamorphoses, a source of inspiration to artists and poets including Chaucer and Shakespeare; the Fasti, a poetic treatment of the Roman year of which Ovid finished only half; the Amores, love poems; the Ars Amatoria, not moral but clever and in parts beautiful; Heroides, fictitious love letters by legendary women to absent husbands; and the dismal works written in exile: the Tristia, appeals to persons including his wife and also the emperor; and similar Epistulae ex Ponto. Poetry came naturally to Ovid, who at his best is lively, graphic and lucid. The Loeb Classical Library edition of Ovid is in six volumes.… (more)

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