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The Monkey and The Tiger by Robert Hans van…
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Member:Littlemissbashful
Title:The Monkey and The Tiger
Authors:Robert Hans van Gulik
Info:University of Chicago Press (1992), Paperback, 152 pages
Collections:Your library,  Books
Rating:***
Tags:Bk 13, Books, Crime Fiction, Fiction - Asia, Fiction - China, Fiction - Historical, Fiction - 7th Century, Judge Dee, Fiction - Tang Dynasty, Historical Crime Fiction, Fiction - Ancient China, Di Renjie, Short Stories

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The Monkey and The Tiger by Robert van Gulik (1965)

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Showing 4 of 4
I do not understand the fascination with scantily clad women and drawings of them in these books. Not knowing enough about 9th century Chinese culture or Judge Dee puts me at a disadvantage. Is it cultural or is it Van Gulik?

Be that as it may, I actually found these two novellas nicer to read than the two longer books I read last year.

In "The Monkey" Judge Dee is watching the gibbons swing through the trees from his balcony when one drops an emerald ring. Dee retrieves the ring, discovers blood on it and goes off to solve the murder, sending Tao Gan through the city to discover what the gossip of the underclass is.

In a convoluted way, we discover that the murder of the owner of the emerald ring and the smuggling ring Judge Dee has been asked to discover are entwined, leading to a neat solution of both mysteries.

"The Tiger" features Judge Dee getting separated from his retinue during a flood and taking cover in a large country house replete with watchtower and a secret room, and about to be set upon by a gang of marauders called "The Flying Tigers."

The ever observant Dee learns that the daughter of the land owner had been killed and a large amount of gold has been stolen. So now, not only does Dee have to contend with extremely foul weather and flooding and bandits, but the mystery of how the daughter died and where the gold went.

Of course Judge Dee figures out that things are not what they appear to be and finds the culprits. So too, are they rescued by the fort across the river from the bandits just in the nick of time. ( )
  AuntieClio | Jan 7, 2014 |
Maybe I just haven't read a Judge Dee mystery in a while, but both of these stories seem to have a hint of misogyny running through them. Also, the denouement of the second story seemed to come out of left field with no hints or slow build-ups to the judge's conclusion. ( )
  VikkiLaw | Apr 4, 2013 |
Two novellas involving Judge Dee. The first starts with a gibbon dropping an antique ring. The second is, like The Haunted Monastery, another isolated house in a storm story, giving van Gulik another great opportunity to show his facility with weather. It's a great story. Bandits outside and a murderer within. ( )
  rameau | Aug 3, 2011 |
Two stories investigated here by Judge Dee. These are 'The Morning of the Monkey' and 'The Night of the Tiger'.
If you are at all familiar with this excellent series of Chinese crime fiction set in ancient times,then this volume follows the set pattern,and will present few surprises.
If they are new to you,do give this one a try,as I am sure that with it's exotic setting and characters it will quickly draw you into it's spell and make you want to read the whole series. ( )
  devenish | Feb 24, 2008 |
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» Add other authors (3 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Gulik, Robert vanprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Ellis, ToniCover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Lindlof, EdCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Dedicated to the memory of my good friend the gibbon
Bubu, died at Port Dickson, Malaya, 12 July 1962.
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Judge Dee was enjoying the cool summer morning in the open gallery built along the rear of his official residence.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Consists of two short stories. The second "The Night of the Tiger" has been separately cataloged so that it can be inserted in the series Judge Dee: Chronological order in its proper place.
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0226848698, Paperback)

The Monkey and The Tiger includes two detective stories, "The Morning of the Monkey" and "The Night of the Tiger." In the first, a gibbon drops an emerald in the open gallery of Dee's official residence, leading the judge to discover a strangely mutilated body in the woods—and how it got there. In the second, Dee is traveling to the imperial capital to assume a new position when he is separated from his escort by a flood. Marooned in a large country house surrounded by fierce bandits, Dee confronts an apparition that helps him solve a mystery.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:55:26 -0400)

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