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Delhi Is Not Far by Ruskin Bond
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Delhi Is Not Far (edition 2005)

by Ruskin Bond

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Member:arvindcaulagi
Title:Delhi Is Not Far
Authors:Ruskin Bond
Info:Penguin Books (2005), Paperback, 120 pages
Collections:Your library, Favorites
Rating:****1/2
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Delhi is Not Far by Ruskin Bond

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Epigraph
'Oh yes, I have known love, and again love,
and many other kinds of love;
but of that tenderness I felt then,
is there nothing I can say?'
-- Andre Gide, Fruits of the Earth
'If I am not for myself, who will be for me?
And if I am not for others, who am I?
And if not now, when?'
-- Hillel (Ancient Hebrew Sage)
Dedication
For Ravi Singh,
who had faith in this
little-known story of mine
First words
My balcony is my window on the world.
Quotations
I don't mind difficulties as long as they are new difficulties. (P.No. 68)
Drunkenness is really a vice because it degrades a man, and humiliates him. Prostitution is degrading but a prostitute can still keep her dignity; thieving is degrading according to the character of the theft; begging is degrading but it is not as undignified as drunkenness. In all our vices we are aware of our degradation; but in drunkenness we loose our pride, our heads, and above all, our natural dignity.We become so obviously and helplessly 'human', that we loose our glorious animal identity. (P.No. 78)
How strange! I don't think that a man can be complete until he has lived in the hills. Of course we are never complete, but there is something about a mountain that adds a new dimension to life. The change in the air and altitude makes one think and feel and act differently. (P.No. 83)
Yesterday I was sad, and tomorrow I may be sad again, but today I know that I am happy. I want to live on and on,delighting like a pagan in all that is physical; and I know that this one lifetime,however long, cannot satisfy my heart. (P.No. 111)
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0144000954, Paperback)

In dull and dusty Pipalnagar, each day is like another, and 'there is not exactly despair, but resignation'. Even the dreams here are small. Adrift among them, the narrator, Arun, a struggling writer of detective novels in Urdu, waits for inspiration to write a blockbuster. Meanwhile, he seeks reassurance in love, and finds it in unusual places: with the young prostitute Kamla, wise beyond her years; and the orphan Suraj, homeless and an epileptic, yet surprisingly optimistic about the future. this is a memorable story about small lives, with all the hallmarks of classic Ruskin Bond prose: nostalgia, charm, underplayed humour and quiet wisdom.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:25:18 -0400)

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