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Celtic Myths and Legends by T. W. Rolleston
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Celtic Myths and Legends (1911)

by T. W. Rolleston

Other authors: See the other authors section.

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Showing 4 of 4
Interesting collection. Good subject matter -- naturally, in my opinion -- and some illustrations. Can't remember much else about it by now, though. Will keep it around to dip into: might be a good source of the germs of some stories. ( )
1 vote shanaqui | Apr 9, 2013 |
This is a pretty darn swell book. It gives some history of the Celtic peoples starting with ancient times and speculating on their interactions and pre-historic culture. Later it gives other details on the mythic histories of various Celtic cultures as well as various mythic and legendary cycles.

I found the details chosen by the author intriguing and the stories engaging.

Heartily recommended for anyone interested in the subject. ( )
1 vote Kisners42 | Jul 14, 2007 |
part of my heritage so well loved ( )
  vicarofdibley | Apr 10, 2006 |
Showing 4 of 4
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
T. W. Rollestonprimary authorall editionscalculated
Leyendecker, J.C.Frontispiecesecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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In the chronicles of the classical nations for about five hundred years previous to the Christian era there are frequent references to a people associated with these nations, sometimes in peace, sometimes in war, and evidently occupying a position of great strength and influence in the Terra Incognita of Mid-Europe.
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Book description
Contents:  
1. Celts in Ancient History 
2. Religion of the Celts 
3. Early Irish Invasion Myths (Mythological Cycle) First of the four great cycles of Irish mythology. A set of tales about the godlike peoples said to have arrived in five migratory invasions into Ireland and principally recounting the doings of the Tuatha Dé Danann. 
4. Early Milesian Kings (Cycles of the Kings or the Historical Cycle): Old & Middle Irish lit. The legendary kings of Ireland, including Cormac mac Airt, Niall of the Nine Hostages, Éogan Mór, Conall Corc, Guaire Aidne mac Colmáin, Diarmait mac Cerbaill, Lugaid mac Con, Conn of the Hundred Battles, Lóegaire mac Néill, Crimthann mac Fidaig, and Brian Bóruma. (421 B.C.E to the 11th Century A.D.) 
 5. Tales of the Ultonian (Ulster) Cycle: Second of the four great cycles of Irish mythology. Medieval Irish heroic legends & sagas of the heroes of the Ulaid (in what is now eastern Ulster & N. Leinster) taking place around or before the 1st century AD. 
6. Tales of the Ossianic (Fenian) Cycle: Third of the four major cycles of Irish mythology. Named of its narrator Oisín. A body of prose & verse centring on the exploits of the hero Fionn mac Cumhaill and his warriors the Fianna.  
7. Voyage of Maelden (Máel Dúin): 8th Century tale of a sea voyage written in Old Irish around the end of the first millennium. Máel Dúin is the son of Ailill Edge-of-Battle, whose murder provides the initial impetus for the tale. 
8. Myths & Tales of the Cymry (Welsh, Wales).  

Genealogical Tables 
• Gods of the House of Dōn  
• Gods of the House of Llyr 
• Arthur & His Kin 

Glossary & Index
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0486265072, Paperback)

Masterful retelling of Irish and Welsh stories and tales of the Ultonian and Ossianic cycles, the voyage of Maeldun, and the myths and tales of the Cymry (Welsh). Favorite and familiar stories of Cuchulain, King Arthur, Deirdre, the Grail, many more. First paperback edition. 58 full-page drawings and 18 figures. Genealogical Tables.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:16:37 -0400)

(see all 6 descriptions)

This text provides an introduction to a past civilisation through the mystery and magic of their story telling, using a collection of stories of Celtic mythology including many of the best known tales from Ireland and Wales along with many of the lesser known. Reset with a new introduction and fresh illustrations together with an extensive index and glossary.… (more)

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