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Anam Cara: A Book of Celtic Wisdom by John…
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Anam Cara: A Book of Celtic Wisdom (original 1997; edition 1998)

by John O'Donohue

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1,397149,605 (4.03)16
Discover the Celtic Circle of Belonging John O'Donohue, poet, philosopher, and scholar, guides you through the spiritual landscape of the Irish imagination. In Anam Cara, Gaelic for "soul friend," the ancient teachings, stories, and blessings of Celtic wisdom provide such profound insights on the universal themes of friendship, solitude, love, and death as: Light is generous The human heart is never completely born Love as ancient recognition The body is the angel of the soul Solitude is luminous Beauty likes neglected places The passionate heart never ages To benatural is to be holy Silence is the sister of the divine Death as an invitation to freedom… (more)
Member:darla.stoneking
Title:Anam Cara: A Book of Celtic Wisdom
Authors:John O'Donohue
Info:Harper Collins (1998), Edition: First Paperback Edition, Paperback, 234 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:*****
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Anam Cara: A Book of Celtic Wisdom by John O'Donohue (1997)

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» See also 16 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 14 (next | show all)
This was one of the hardest star ratings I have ever given a book, I am not sure why, I think because rating the contents of the book somehow felt like cheapening them. I gave it three in the end, because although I am glad I read it, and some parts have stuck with me, it wasn't as interesting, nor as magical in its prose, as I had hoped.

Although it was a short book, with short chapters, it still felt difficult to push through it. I liked the chapter structure, following the Celtic theme of life's circularity but I think I would have enjoyed the book a lot more if it had gone into more detail, and introduced more Celtic mythology - of which there seemed to be relatively little, in comparison to the author's personal 'wisdom' - which I think made up far more of the book. Celtic wisdom and mythology was a topic I was looking forward to learning about, but after having read this I don't feel as enlightened as I thought I might.

I liked the etymological explanations, the bits of Irish history when they arose, and the poetry scattered in the pages. There certainly was some nice tidbits of wisdom in the pages, various perspectives on life/death/friendship/love. I feel the attempt to marry Christian and Celtic teachings together as though they existed happily together in peace throughout all of history was a bit insincere and almost whitewashing the reality of Pagan-Christian relations. I am not sure of the author's personal religious leanings, but Christianity has a long history of adopting pagan myths/symbols and christening them as their own. ( )
1 vote kateisabella | Aug 2, 2020 |
Another copy
  holycrossabbey | Jul 15, 2019 |
I enjoyed hearing O'Donohue's thoughts in audio form, as a bit of a lecture. The structure is different from the later Kindle and print version of the content, but it's pretty similar. In particular, O'Donohue's stories and his descriptions of time and of death from the Celtic perspective were highlights. ( )
  patl | Feb 18, 2019 |
There is so much depth to this book that I hardly know where to begin. The insights into the spirituality of the five senses alone is worth the read. For those who might be seeking deeper spiritual development and certainly for those who are students of Celtic spirituality, this book is a must read - O'Donohue explores Celtic wisdom and spiritual understandings in light of modern understandings of Christian spirituality to give insight into the way the two come together and the depths of the spiritual traditions with the Celtic practices of Christian spirituality. ( )
1 vote Al-G | Jul 17, 2017 |
Irish poet, philosopher and Catholic scholar John O'Donohue guides readers through the refreshing and lyrical landscape of the Irish imagination, offering a treasure trove of Celtic insights, stories, and teachings on the universal themes of friendship, solitude, love, and death.
  PendleHillLibrary | Feb 16, 2017 |
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
John O'Donohueprimary authorall editionscalculated
Bandini, DitteTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Bandini, GiovanniTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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If you have ever had occasion to be out early in the morning before the dawn breaks, you will have noticed that the darkest time of night is immediately before dawn.
It is strange to be here. The mystery leaves you alone.
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Discover the Celtic Circle of Belonging John O'Donohue, poet, philosopher, and scholar, guides you through the spiritual landscape of the Irish imagination. In Anam Cara, Gaelic for "soul friend," the ancient teachings, stories, and blessings of Celtic wisdom provide such profound insights on the universal themes of friendship, solitude, love, and death as: Light is generous The human heart is never completely born Love as ancient recognition The body is the angel of the soul Solitude is luminous Beauty likes neglected places The passionate heart never ages To benatural is to be holy Silence is the sister of the divine Death as an invitation to freedom

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