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Talking to Dragons: The Enchanted Forest…
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Talking to Dragons: The Enchanted Forest Chronicles, Book Four (4) (original 1985; edition 2015)

by Patricia C. Wrede (Author)

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2,694353,742 (4.05)85
Queen Cimorene sends her sixteen-year-old son Daystar into the Enchanted Forest with the only weapon that can combat an evil wizard's magic in an effort to restore the balance of power in the kingdom.
Member:ihatemyelf
Title:Talking to Dragons: The Enchanted Forest Chronicles, Book Four (4)
Authors:Patricia C. Wrede (Author)
Info:HMH Books for Young Readers (2015), Edition: Reprint, 304 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:***1/2
Tags:None

Work details

Talking to Dragons by Patricia C. Wrede (1985)

  1. 00
    The Magical Misadventures of Prunella Bogthistle by Deva Fagan (dylanesque)
    dylanesque: Talking to Dragons and the Magical Misadventures of Prunella Bogthistle share an irreverent, light-hearted tone, a magical coming-of-age quest, unlikely friends, and a rich magical world.
  2. 00
    Ordinary Magic by Caitlen Rubino-Bradway (LongDogMom)
    LongDogMom: Similar style and humour, as well as pushing against the stereotypes and rigid expectations that society believes people fall into just because of what they are.
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English (34)  German (1)  All languages (35)
Showing 1-5 of 34 (next | show all)
A great ending to end the series. A bit odd that the first three are told in to third person and then the forth book is told in first person. Accuse you will know what going to happen next.
For me, this is the second time I read the whole series and I don't care, because I like the books.
The best book out of the whole series is the first one, Dealing with Dragons.
I think anyone will like this. You don't has to read the first three to get what going on in the the forth book Talking to Dragons, but then again it helps to know a little background of what happen before. ( )
  AnnaBookcritter | Sep 15, 2020 |
A great ending to end the series. A bit odd that the first three are told in to third person and then the forth book is told in first person. Accuse you will know what going to happen next.
For me, this is the second time I read the whole series and I don't care, because I like the books.
The best book out of the whole series is the first one, Dealing with Dragons.
I think anyone will like this. You don't has to read the first three to get what going on in the the forth book Talking to Dragons, but then again it helps to know a little background of what happen before. ( )
  AnnaBookcritter | Sep 15, 2020 |
I loved this series, and felt like this book, while it had some issues, was better than the previous one, which was (for me) the weakest of them.

I do think maybe Daystar was too rational and logical to be an actual teenage boy. I still liked him though, even if he felt a little wooden at times. The fire witch was the standout character, imo. ( )
  livingtech | Mar 18, 2020 |
Although Talking to Dragons is the fourth book in Patricia C. Wrede's Enchanted Forest chronicles, it was published five years before Ms. Wrede started filling out the back story of our 16 year-old hero, Daystar's, remarkable parents. (I'd wondered how Ms. Wrede could do something so nasty to Cimorene and Mendanbar as to part them from each other for so long some months before Daystar's birth. The three back story books are Dealing With Dragons, Searching for Dragons, and Calling on Dragons, in that order. Daystar and Shiara are okay, but as a hero and heroine they can't begin to compare to Cimorene and Mendanbar.

Daystar has been living with his mother in a cottage at the edge of the Enchanted Forest. He may assume he's only a poor boy, but his mother has been teaching him what he'll need to know when he's able to assume his proper station in life. His adventures begin when the wizard Antorell blows up their cottage door. The method Cimorene uses to deal with Antorell is not the same as the one discovered in book one, but after 16 years, we shouldn't be surprised that she found another.

Cimorene retrieves a sword readers of the earlier books will recognize at once, buckles it on her confused son, and orders him not to return until he can explain to her why he had to leave. Daystar doesn't argue with her for long. He starts going through the Enchanted Forest as he was told. He meets a talking gold lizard named Suz. Suz tells him his sword is the Sword of the Sleeping King and to follow it, but not as much as Daystar wants to know. Then he meets Shiara the fire-witch.

NOTES:

Chapter 1: Suz the gold lizard is introduced.

Chapter 2: Daystar and Shiara meet.

Chapter 3: We learn Shiara's problem.

Chapter 5: Morwen enters the scene. She says a helpful spell.

Chapter 6: Here is where Shiara names the kitten Morwen gave her 'Nightwitch'.

Chapter 7: Enjoy the interaction among Daystar, Shiara, and a princess in great distress.

Chapter 8: We meet a dragon and a knight.

Chapter 10: There's a fully grown fire-witch in this one. Daystar recites another spell his mother taught him.

Chapter 11: We have the Peter de Sève cover scene!

Chapter 13: Telemain introduces himself to Daystar and Shiara after they come to his home. He says he and Morwen grew up together. He also mentions the unpleasant habits of the fire-witch from chapter 10. Ew. According to Telemain, the Sword of the Sleeping King was meant to deal with wizards.

Chapter 14: Telemain advises going through the Caves of Chance to avoid the wizards. He also gives pointers about dealing with trolls and rock snakes. Also, our little group has to deal with a quarter of the wizards looking for Daystar and Shiara.

Chapter 15: Daystar finds a key and meets a quozzel.

Chapter 17: Daystar tells Shiara why she had so much trouble when she tried to snitch some of the Prince of the Ruby Throne's apples. He also figures out how to solve Shiara's problem.

Chapter 18: Daystar, Shiara, and Nightwitch meet Kazul. They find out who the dragon too young to have a name is.

Chapter 20: We learn what happened to Antorell's father, Zemenar.

Chapter 22 has the conversation that will eventually lead to this book becoming the fourth in a series instead of a stand-alone.

While I don't like this book nearly as well as the earlier ones, it gets really good in the last few chapters, so I gave it the same four stars I gave the other books. I hope that now that the need for secrecy is over, Daystar can develop more sense. There were times when I was just as upset with him as Shiara was. It's not that he's stupid, he just hasn't figured out yet when the rules he was taught should be ignored. (I am reminded of a song on an old Disney record of mine advising never to smile at a crocodile. There's a line about there always being a special case where one should forget etiquette. How true.)

Dragon lovers: Kazul won't be seen until the last few chapters, but there's a very young dragon to enjoy.

Cat lovers: Besides scenes with Morwen's cats (and how I loved their reaction to an announcement the witch made in the last chapter), there's Nightwitch, the kitten Morwen gave to Shiara.

Bottom line: You might wish to go ahead and read this book first even though you'll be spoiled for the main events in the other, better books. Reading the others after this one will be like reading the book a movie was based on after seeing the movie, when you find you like the book more. ( )
  JalenV | Feb 26, 2020 |
Man, this book was a bit of a slog to get through. Out of all the narrators we've had in the Enchanted Forest Chronicles, Daystar is the least interesting of them all. He's boring, polite to a fault, and just a bit bland. All the characters I like in the other books (Cimorene, Morwen, Kazul, ect.) make short appearances in this book. I also didn't really like Shiara, either. I understand her main character quirk is that she isn't polite, which is fine, but it got old reading about her real quick. The action and magic in this book also doesn't live up to the other books in the series. Just not that interesting. It was nice to see what happened with all the characters I liked from the other books, but I didn't really care about the characters introduced in this book. . The first book, [b:Dealing with Dragons|150739|Dealing with Dragons (Enchanted Forest Chronicles, #1)|Patricia C. Wrede|https://images.gr-assets.com/books/1385526967s/150739.jpg|1178402] is my personal favorite. I do like the second and third books too. The fourth book, unless you are finishing the series, I give a hard pass. ( )
  rkcraig88 | Jul 15, 2019 |
Showing 1-5 of 34 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (2 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Wrede, Patricia C.primary authorall editionsconfirmed
de Sève, PeterCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Hartman, DaliaDesignersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Hyman, Trina SchartCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Paarma, Susanna(KÄÄnt.)secondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Puda, JeffCover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed

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Dedication
For NATE (who started it),
and for the rest of the Scribblies:

STEVE, PAM, KARA,
WILL, and EMMA.
First words
Mother taught me to be polite to dragons.
Quotations
I took a deep breath and spoke as steadily as I could:

'Sword of the Sleeping King,
I conjure thee:
By stream and starlight,
By sun and shadow,
By song and storm wind,
Show me thy tale!
(chapter 2)
We both nodded, and Kazul smiled again. 'Well, then. There are two types of magic in the world: the kind you're born with, and the kind you get from something else. Dragons' -- Kazul looked smug -- 'elves, unicorns, and fire-witches are born with magic. Ordinary witches and magicians get their magic from objects or from rituals involving things that have magic, which works quite well and doesn't upset things.

'Wizards, on the other hand, get their magic from everything around them that happens to have magic. Those staffs of theirs absorb little bits of it constantly, and the suction gets worse every time a wizard stores a new spell in his staff. That, by the way, is why dragons are allergic to wizards. Whenever those staffs get near us, they start trying to soak up some of our magic and we start sneezing.' (chapter 18)
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Queen Cimorene sends her sixteen-year-old son Daystar into the Enchanted Forest with the only weapon that can combat an evil wizard's magic in an effort to restore the balance of power in the kingdom.

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