HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

The Technological Society by Jacques Ellul
Loading...

The Technological Society

by Jacques Ellul

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
568226,628 (4.07)10
Recently added by-__-, h1ren, wwso, laprop1990, ckadams5, haagen_daz
Legacy LibrariesWalker Percy
None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 10 mentions

Showing 2 of 2
Just glanced at
  Baku-X | Jan 10, 2017 |
This is a very interesting book, and one not well know to many outside France. Ellul is one of the few philosophers who devoted much of his life to the understanding of technology as a stand-alone phenomenon. With great care, the author takes you through a detailed explanation of technology's manifestation, and how it goes on to transform the world we live in. There are different thoughts on how technology can be controlled, but in the end, Ellul feels there is no stopping it. We must simply learn to live with this thing that is both part of our human definition, and a transformative force unto itself.The writing style is fairly good, having been translated with care. However, one can not help but feel some level of awkwardness which hints to the original French manuscript. I would also advise that this book be read several times. One reading can only serve to introduce readers to the basic concepts and multitude of supporting authors that Ellul uses to both compare and contrast his ideas against. ( )
1 vote sgarnell | Jul 10, 2012 |
Showing 2 of 2
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (2)

Book description
Haiku summary

No descriptions found.

As insightful and wise today as it was when originally published in 1954, Jacques Ellul's The Technological Society has become a classic in its field, laying the groundwork for all other studies of technology and society that have followed.   Ellul offers a penetrating analysis of our technological civilization, showing how technology--which began innocuously enough as a servant of humankind--threatens to overthrow humanity itself in its ongoing creation of an environment that meets its own ends. No conversation about the dangers of technology and its unavoidable effects on society can begin without a careful reading of this book.   "A magnificent book . . . He goes through one human activity after another and shows how it has been technicized, rendered efficient, and diminished in the process."--Harper's   "One of the most important books of the second half of the twentieth-century. In it, Jacques Ellul convincingly demonstrates that technology, which we continue to conceptualize as the servant of man, will overthrow everything that prevents the internal logic of its development, including humanity itself--unless we take necessary steps to move human society out of the environment that 'technique' is creating to meet its own needs."--The Nation   "A description of the way in which technology has become completely autonomous and is in the process of taking over the traditional values of every society without exception, subverting and suppressing these values to produce at last a monolithic world culture in which all non-technological difference and variety are mere appearance."--Los Angeles Free Press… (more)

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (4.07)
0.5
1 1
1.5
2 2
2.5
3 2
3.5 2
4 14
4.5 1
5 12

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 136,508,808 books! | Top bar: Always visible