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The Darwin Awards: Evolution in Action by…
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The Darwin Awards: Evolution in Action (edition 2002)

by Wendy Northcutt

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1,487157,289 (3.44)26
Member:Skaidon
Title:The Darwin Awards: Evolution in Action
Authors:Wendy Northcutt
Info:Plume (2002), Paperback, 352 pages
Collections:Your library
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The Darwin Awards: Evolution in Action by Wendy Northcutt

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Not much I can say about this one: it's a collection of Darwin award winners (and the honourable mentions) and their stories. It's both hilarious and possibly a sad commentary on the advancement, or lack thereof, of common sense.

For anyone who might not be familiar with the Darwin Awards, they are given each year for:
significantly improve the gene pool by eliminating themselves from the human race in an obviously stupid way. They are self-selected examples of the dangers inherent in a lack of common sense, and all human races, cultures, and socioeconomic groups are eligible to compete. Actual winners must meet the following criteria:

Reproduction
Out of the gene pool: dead or sterile.
Excellence
Astounding misapplication of judgment.
Self-Selection
Cause one's own demise.
Maturity
Capable of sound judgment.
Veracity
The event must be true.

(source: darwinawards.com/rules)

Always good for a chuckle! ( )
  murderbydeath | Dec 26, 2016 |
An entertaining account of people who've removed themselves from the gene pool by their own stupidity. Effort has been made to verify the veracity of these tales, which read a lot like urban legends. A quick read, although maybe not one to get through in one sitting. Best read in snippets (waiting rooms, public transportation, etc) ( )
1 vote EmScape | Sep 12, 2016 |
Want to read about idiots? This is the book for you. Darwin Awards are given to those who cannot pass their genes on, which is a good thing for the rest of the human race. Hilarious and entertaining stories. ( )
  BrittanyLyn | Jun 22, 2016 |
Funny and entertaining if you are into this type of book. If you are easily offended you should probably pass. I would highly recommend. ( )
  lacey.tucker | Mar 10, 2016 |
This wasn't as funny or entertaining as I imagined. ( )
  jimocracy | Apr 18, 2015 |
Showing 1-5 of 15 (next | show all)
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Epigraph
Whilst this planet has gone on cycling
according the fixed law of gravity, endless
forms most beautiful and most wonderful have been, and are being, evolved. --Charles Darwin in The Origins of the Species
Dedication
To my sister Elizabeth, who encouraged me to blaze my own path. To my parents, because the apple doesn't fall far from the tree. And to Jacob, who appreciates my oddly successful impetuousness and provide clever chapter titles.

Warm thanks to editor Mitch Hoffman and agent Andrew Stuart, whose expert hands helped shape this book, and to my Philosophy Forum members for their stimulating conversations.

And to Ian.
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Amazon.com Amazon.com Review (ISBN 0452283442, Paperback)

Warning: The Darwin Awards are not for the tenderhearted. The vastly popular Web site, now a book, recognizes "individuals who ensure the long-term survival of our species by removing themselves from the gene pool in a sublimely idiotic fashion." Who wins a Darwin Award? Terrorists who set their bombs on daylight saving time and delivered them on standard time, blowing themselves up. Folks who put garlands around a Bengal tiger's neck. Guys in Cambodia who took turns stomping on a land mine they'd brought into a bar. The six Egyptians who drowned trying to rescue a chicken that fell into a well. (The chicken alone survived.) The Buenos Aires husband who threw his wife out an eighth-floor window during a spat, noticed she'd gotten caught in power lines, and jumped after her, "angrily trying to finish the job, or remorsefully hoping to rescue her." He went splat; she escaped unscathed. There are some urban legends, like the sergeant said to have attached a Jet-Assisted Take-Off unit to his Chevy and hit a cliff 125 feet up (not true, says author Wendy Northcutt), and all-too-true honorable mentions, like the man who put weather balloons on his lawn chair, soared to 16,000 feet, crashed into power lines, blacked out Long Beach, California, and told police, "A man can't just sit around." My favorite winner: the man who was bitten nine times by the same king brown snake because he put it in a bag on his car seat and kept sticking his hand back into the bag. Why did he pick up the snake with his left hand? "Because I was holding a beer in my right one." And where did this take place? In Darwin, Australia. If you think somebody up there doesn't have a wicked sense of humor, The Darwin Awards may change your mind. --Tim Appelo

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:07:51 -0400)

(see all 6 descriptions)

Presents more than 250 true stories--and urban legends--about people who died largely due to their own stupidity.

(summary from another edition)

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