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Hyvä maa by Pearl S. Buck
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Hyvä maa (edition 1995)

by Pearl S. Buck, Vera Snellman (KÄÄnt.)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
9,254182323 (4.07)501
Member:MyLibSV
Title:Hyvä maa
Authors:Pearl S. Buck
Other authors:Vera Snellman (KÄÄnt.)
Info:Porvoo : Helsinki : Juva : WSOY, 1995.
Collections:Your library, Favorites
Rating:*****
Tags:romaanit, sukuromaanit, kaunokirjallisuus, Kiina, maaseutu, maanviljelijät, yhteiskunnallinen eriarvoisuus, köyhät, rikkaat, menestys, rikastuminen, elämänviisaus, ihmissuhteet, suku, perhe, petos, vanheneminen, viisaus, oppiminen

Work details

The Good Earth by Pearl S. Buck

  1. 80
    Snow Flower and the Secret Fan: A Novel by Lisa See (mcenroeucsb)
    mcenroeucsb: Both are well-written novels set in late 19th/early 20th century China.
  2. 71
    The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck (John_Vaughan)
  3. 51
    East of Eden by John Steinbeck (John_Vaughan)
  4. 30
    Dragon Seed by Pearl S. Buck (deeyes)
    deeyes: Dragon seed is similar but better pearl buck book
  5. 30
    Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe (Ellen_Elizabeth)
    Ellen_Elizabeth: Another classic, historical fiction novel that explores a traditional culture through the story of one man and his family. Both were written in English and illustrate the author's perceived strengths and weaknesses of the subject culture in a way that is accessible to western readers.… (more)
  6. 42
    Wild Swans: Three Daughters of China by Jung Chang (ominogue)
  7. 21
    The Plum in the Golden Vase or, Chin P'ing Mei: Vol. 1, The Gathering by Lanling Xiaoxiao Sheng (pseudonym) (orangewords)
  8. 11
    The Pearl by John Steinbeck (Authoress)
    Authoress: Families who go through times of both wealth and poverty are featured in both works
  9. 11
    Satan in Goray by Isaac Bashevis Singer (SanctiSpiritus)
  10. 11
    Pao by Kerry Young (sturlington)
  11. 11
    The City of Joy by Dominique Lapierre (orangewords)
  12. 23
    Sea of Poppies by Amitav Ghosh (jennyl.keen)
  13. 12
    Growth of the Soil by Knut Hamsun (thatguyzero)
  14. 13
    The Glass Palace by Amitav Ghosh (ominogue)
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» See also 501 mentions

English (174)  German (3)  Spanish (2)  Danish (1)  Portuguese (Brazil) (1)  Finnish (1)  All languages (182)
Showing 1-5 of 174 (next | show all)
I was really into this book pretty much the entire time. books about people's love for the land draw me in quickly. I loved the protagonist at the beginning. the way he talked about the land and the fulfillment he felt when he was working on it was so nice to read about. it made me really sad to see him go in this downward spiral of accumulating more wealth and land and women and less and less happiness. the whole time i was reading the book i kept waiting for that great final scene where the protagonist was finally redeemed... and well i guess i won't tell you if that happens or not, in case you might read the book. ( )
  klburnside | Aug 11, 2015 |
The fictional life of one man in China in the late 19th, early 20th centuries. Very little mention of the wider world of a specific events.
  FKarr | Jul 3, 2015 |
Okay, it's come to my attention that "carpetbagger" doesn't mean what I thought it did, but what I meant to convey by using that word in my original review is that Pearl S. Buck used her quasi-insider status as the children of missionaries growing up in China (speaking Chinese and all, but only because she picked it up from her amah or whatever) to sell a putative special access to the "real" Inner Workings of the Middle Kingdom, and this book is powerful in a James Michener/Edward Rutherfurd epic sweep/small lives kind of way, but it borrows so much Biblical cadence and dips sometimes into Chinasploitation (the stuff about how women are "only slaves" and a girl child is a moderate letdown, I mean, I wasn't there and I don't doubt that it's true--I understand such attitudes persist--but my spidey sense seems to feel that Pearl S. Buck is playing it up, emphasizing it a bit more than needed both as a way of shoehorning in exposition of the "Wang Lung, as you know a girl is only a slave and not as good as a boy, but still, congratulations from me, your neighbour Ching! Thank you for the hardboiled egg" kind, and also as a way of cloaking salacious exoticism in realism, of course). This still makes it a fairly enjoyable light realist read as long as you don't take Pearl S. Buck for the final authority on China in the early 20th century or god forbid, "the Chinese" as a whole, but in this day and age, who would? (Read Lu Xun!) It also makes the introduction and reviews included here an uncomfortable experience, as the Chinese and Korean reviewers who took issue with some of Buck's depiction of Chinese culture and Asian mores are dismissed in sneering fashion by a consensus of snooty Ivy League professors (in tweed) and degenerate New York critics (seersucker) and also when Pearl S. Buck herself joins in to do the same (in some kind of dress that goes from neck to ankle, as I imagine her), asserting perfunctorily, since she knows the US literary establishment will back her to the hilt kneejerk fashion, that Chinese writers who quibble with her portrayal are just bourgeois reactionaries who don't want to admit their glorious civilization has such a thing as a peasantry. And granted, there is likely a grain of truth in that too; but the effortless assumption on the part of the everybody of the day that this was the Great Chinese Novel and only an American could write it really could only seem socially progressive in the context of a recent past where novelists referred to the Chinese as "celestials," inscrutable, etc. ( )
2 vote MeditationesMartini | Jul 3, 2015 |
Very verbose story of the rise of a farmer to wealth. Many of the details were illuminating while others were tedious. I felt the story line was too drawn out and the impact of the plot could've been made ½ way through the novel. Of course it is extremely well written (I.e. It is s Pulitzer Prize winning work), but perhaps literary style does not translate into modern times. ( )
  connianne | Jun 5, 2015 |
The book gives us a glimpse of the patriarchal society of rural China with emphasis on a woman's status and worth. I appreciate the obvious heart of the author for farmers and the poor and the plight of women in Old China which is still true in some cultures now in our already modern times.

I have no deep knowledge of Chinese culture, only the art and food as I experienced today. Pearl S. Buck has given me a peek into the "old ways" of China which may seem barbaric to us now with the slavery of young girls, arranged marriages, concubinage and women's binding of the feet. But she has presented it in a descriptive way, free of criticism and only attempting to narrate the facts of life as seen in the eyes of a proud patriarchal farmer in such times and through the eyes and heart of a rural poor wife in such era.

I admire how the author has given power to the first wife character that even with her silence and seemingly blind obedience to her husband, she has the most profound grasp of their life and is the actual pillar of the family during their troubled times. She is a true matriarch with no voice, whose value is acknowledged by the husband only at the end. Her giving soul is so touching that a woman reader may question her own parenting and domestic capacity and duty as a wife.

I recommend this book as a good slow read, that will give you an appreciation of the land, its toils and value both to the well-being of a person's body and soul. ( )
1 vote CarylGonzales | May 31, 2015 |
Showing 1-5 of 174 (next | show all)
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Pearl S. Buckprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Heald, AnthonyNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Epigraph
...This was what Vinteuil had done for the little phrase. Swann felt that the composer had been content (with the instruments at his disposal) to draw aside its veil, to make it visible, following and respecting its outlines with a hand so loving, so prudent, so delicate and so sure, that the sound altered at every moment, blunting itself to indicate a shadow, springing back into life when it must follow the curve of some more bold projection. And one proof that Swann was not mistaken when believed in the real existence of this phrase was that anyone with an ear at all delicate for music would have at once detected the imposture had Vinteuil, endowed with less power to see and to render its forms, sought to dissemble (by adding a line, here and there, of his own invention) the dimness of his vision or the feebleness of his hand. -- Swann's Way, by Marcel Proust
Dedication
First words
It was Wang Lung's marriage day.
Quotations
He had no articulate thought of anything; there was only this perfect sympathy of movement, of turning this earth of theirs over and over to the sun, this earth which formed their home and fed their bodies and made their gods. The earth lay rich and dark, and fell apart lightly under the points of their hoes, Sometimes they turned up a bit of brick, a splinter of wood. It was nothing. Sometimes, in some age, bodies of men and women had been buried there, houses had stood there, had fallen, and gone back into the earth. So would also their house, sometime, return into the earth, their bodies also. Each had his turn at this earth. They worked on, moving together – together – producing the fruit of this earth – speechless in their movement together.
…he said nothing still, she looked at him piteously and sadly out of her strange dumb eyes that were like a beast’s eyes that cannot speak, and then she went away, creeping and feeling for the door because of her tears that blinded her.

Wang Lung watched her as she went and he was glad to be alone, but still he was ashamed and he was still angry that he was ashamed, and he said to himself, and he muttered the words aloud and restlessly, as though he quarreled with someone, “Well, and other men are so and I have been good enough to her, and there are men worse than I.” And he said at last that O-lan must bear it.
My house and my land it is, and if it were not for the land we should all starve as the others did, and you could not walk about in your dainty robes idle as a scholar. It is the good land that has made you something better than a farmer’s lad.
Last words
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0743272935, Paperback)

Pearl S. Buck's epic

Pulitzer Prize-winning novel of a China that was

-- now in a Contemporary Classics

edition.

Though more than sixty years have passed

since this remarkable novel won the Pulitzer

Prize, it has retained its popularity and become

one of the great modern classics. "I can only

write what I know, and I know nothing but China,

having always lived there," wrote Pearl Buck. In

The Good Earth she presents a graphic

view of a China when the last emperor reigned

and the vast political and social upheavals of

the twentieth century were but distant rumblings

for the ordinary people. This moving, classic

story of the honest farmer Wang Lung and his

selfless wife O-lan is must reading for those

who would fully appreciate the sweeping changes

that have occurred in the lives of the Chinese

people during this century.

Nobel Prize winner Pearl S. Buck traces the

whole cycle of life: its terrors, its passions,

its ambitions and rewards. Her brilliant novel

-- beloved by millions of readers -- is a

universal tale of the destiny of man.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:07:23 -0400)

(see all 5 descriptions)

Pearl S. Buck's epic Pulitzer prize-winning novel of a China that was now in a contemporary classics edition. Though more than sixty years have passed since this remarkable novel won the Pulitzer prize, it has retained its popularity and become one of the great modern classics. "I can only write what I know, and I know nothing but China, having always lived there," wrote Pearl Buck. In the Good Earth she presents a graphic view of a China when the last emperor reigned and the vast political and social upheavals of the twentieth century were but distant rumblings for the ordinary people. This moving, classic story of the honest farmer Wang Lung and his selfless wife o-lan is must reading for those who would fully appreciate the sweeping changes that have occurred in the lives of the Chinese people during this century. Nobel Prize winner Pearl S. Buck traces the whole cycle of life: its terrors, its passions, its ambitions and rewards. Her brilliant novel, beloved by millions of readers, is a universal tale of the destiny of man. Enduring literature illuminated by practical scholarship a poignant tale about the life and labors of a Chinese farmer during the sweeping reign of the country s last emperor. Each enriched classic edition includes: A concise introduction that gives readers important background information, a chronology of the author's life and work, a timeline of significant events that provides the book's historical context, an outline of key themes and plot points to help readers form their own interpretations, detailed explanatory notes, a critical analysis, including contemporary and modern perspectives on the work, discussion questions to promote lively classroom and book group interaction, a list of recommended related books and films to broaden the reader's experience. Enriched Classics offer readers affordable editions of great works of literature enhanced by helpful notes and insightful commentary. The scholarship provided in Enriched Classics enables readers to appreciate, understand, and enjoy the world's finest books to their full potential. Pulitzer Prize fiction, 1932.… (more)

(summary from another edition)

» see all 14 descriptions

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